Tag Archives: science

The Disintegration of the Enlightenment

Stephen Hicks, some of whose YouTube videos I’ve been watching recently, dates  Enlightenment modernism from about 1600 to 1800, and locates its origins in England. And he dates post-modernism from Immanuel Kant, 1724 – 1804, when Kant declared that pure … Continue reading

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Interesting Fictions

I’m currently hooked on an interesting fiction. It’s the idea that when the Earth gets covered in ice – as it seems that it periodically has been -, the ice acts as a layer of insulation on the rock beneath … Continue reading

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Is It All Connected?

Hawaii: We haven’t seen anything like this since Hawaii first became a state back in 1959. Kilauea began erupting on May 3rd, and it hasn’t stopped rumbling yet. In fact, authorities are telling us that Hawaii has been struck by “over 12,000 … Continue reading

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The Alarmist Playbook

For some time now – perhaps even the last 10 years – I’ve tended to strongly associate antismoking alarmism with global warming alarmism, with antismoking alarmism the senior partner that preceded global warming alarmism by some 50 years, with one … Continue reading

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Wonderful Fiction

I’ve never been to America. And so it remains for me a fictional place. I believe it exists, but I’ve never actually been there, and so I don’t know for sure. I think you have to go somewhere to experience … Continue reading

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From Enthusiasm To Zealotry

I get enthusiastic about ideas. When, on 15 February 2013, a small asteroid exploded over Chelyabinsk, and on the same day the larger asteroid 2012 DA14 passed within 28,000 km of the Earth, and NASA immediately declared that the two … Continue reading

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Broken

There’s no substitute for experience. You have to be there, and watch it happening. In the Department of Engineering of the University of Bristol, I used to watch big engines breaking concrete and wooden beams and columns. It was a … Continue reading

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