Smoking Booths Designed By Sadists

Chris Snowdon has a handy guide for who not to vote for in our upcoming General Election. It includes Personal Liberty Rankings for each party. Conservatives come top with three stars, Plaid Cymru bottom with one star, all the rest two stars (Brexit party not reviewed).

Or at least I suppose three stars is better than one star. Maybe the Conservatives came third, and Plaid Cymru first?

I didn’t know that the Greens want to

Support the transition to plant-based diets by phasing in a tax on meat and dairy products over the next ten years, to reduce the 5% of the UK’s carbon emissions that come from the methane produced by livestock.

But it seems like a good reason not to vote for them.

All votes that I cast these days are negative votes. The party that gets the cross put next to it is never the party I want to see in office, but the party that I least don’t want to see in office.

I’ll never vote Labour or Lib Dem: those bastards voted for the 2007 UK smoking ban, and I’ll never forgive them for it.

Simon Clark has been strolling round the European Parliament, and writes:

Elsewhere there were small smoking booths, like the one below. Whatever your view of smoking, I really don’t see how anyone could object to having similar booths in enclosed public places in the UK, which raises an important point.

There is a lot wrong with the European Parliament, and I shall be gutted if the UK is still in the EU the next time I visit Brussels, but the accommodation of smokers within the main Parliament building should be applauded.

Really? What’s there to applaud about that? It looks to me like a public urinal. And a glass public urinal in which people can be watched while they’re urinating.

This is a room that has been designed to humiliate the people inside it. It’s grey and unwelcoming. There are no stools or seats for anyone to sit on. Occupants must stand facing the wall, once they’ve managed to squeeze their way in.

So, yes, I thoroughly object to this. What they should have instead is a place about ten times bigger, with tables and chairs, and posters on the walls,  and curtains in the windows, and a bar at one end with a welcoming bartender and lots of bottles behind him. A bit like this:

About Frank Davis

smoker
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Smoking Booths Designed By Sadists

  1. Mark Jarratt says:

    Totally, ugly smoking ghettos or corrals, the neo prohibitionist version of being placed in stocks in the town square and pelted with rotten fruit, horse dung or worse. Better than hospitals though, with many removing their smoking ghetto sheds and prohibiting smoking anywhere, even in the open air. Inhumane fascism…you will be “cured” of smoking whether you like it or not. My body my choice? Not if you are a smoker, a second class citizen hopelessly addicted, because the anti-tobacco zealots make careers of bullying addicts, obviously a reasonable and balanced approach (not). 😡

  2. RdM says:

    Smoky bar somewhere … like ?
    http://kalyan.bar/bars/ua/kiev/smoky-kiev/

    Spotted … ;=})

  3. roobeedoo2 says:

    Why does do the smoking stalls have holes in the plexiglass wall? Doesn’t that defeat the object?

  4. waltc says:

    I think it’s not holes, just a ‘”decorative effect.” Meanwhile, I got claustrophobia just looking at that. No thanks, I’ll “just step outside.”

  5. Joe L. says:

    Those “smoking booths” have been around for a while. The first (and only) one I encountered was in a government building in Rome, Italy when I was there on a work-related trip in 2009. That one was called “Smoke ‘n’ Go” (the name was frosted in a large font on the glass). It only had one ashtray, so it was narrower and it seemed a little bit deeper than the one in the photo above. You could fit about four people maximum in it (and I wouldn’t say “comfortably”).

    When you step inside and close the door, it activated a powerful ventilation fan, which was quite loud, making it a very poor place to hold a conversation over a cigarette. The booth wasn’t completely sealed; there were gaps between the glass and parts of the frame (so I believe those are most likely actual holes in the glass of the booth in the picture Frank posted). While it may seem counterintuitive to have holes/gaps, they act as air intake ports for the ventilation system. The ventilation fan created constant air movement (it felt like constant light breeze) which sucked all smoke out the top of the booth; it can’t leak out the holes/gaps, as air is constantly being pulled inward from them.

    It was claustrophobic, breezy and annoyingly loud. However, the worst part of it, in my opinion, was the transparent glass walls made me feel like a caged zoo animal. People would walk past the booth and gaze in at the “homo fumus” on display. It made for an uncomfortable experience. I only used it once to try it out, and I rarely saw any employees using it in the week I was there. The weather was nice and the smoking booth was located on the first floor only about 50 feet from a door, so I (and most of the Italian smokers) preferred “exiling ourselves to the outdoors” over using the loud, uncomfortable wind tunnel display case smoking booth.

  6. jaxthefirst says:

    It’s a funny little anomaly, isn’t it, that in all those places which are still permitted to have smoking “rooms” they always seem to have those glass walls. With all the hoo-ha about “denormalising” smoking and avoiding the sight of people having a cigarette, you’d think that they’d at least give the rooms solid walls, or some kind of blinds or curtains, so that all those terribly easily-influenced non-smokers wouldn’t be tempted over to “the dark side” by the sight of all those people enjoying a relaxing smoke, wouldn’t you.

    But I think there’s a reason for this. Although it might seem on the surface that this is an attempt at a bit of gratuitous “shaming” on behalf of the anti-smokers, I think the real reason is that there’s a funny sort of fear amongst many anti-smokers (maybe even amongst the less zealous non-smokers) that if the smoking room is inside, but nonetheless just like a separate room – with a door and proper walls, so that passers-by can’t see in – that smokers will form their own sort of little “club” where they can sit gossiping and chatting and getting to know each other, which the non-smokers will somehow be excluded from.

    And oddly enough, I think they could be right, because smokers are more sociable and friendly than non-smokers and smoking as an activity is very unifying somehow and does tend to make people relax and feel comfortable getting to know each other. Back in the days when we had a smoking room at work, a particular group of the non-smokers went to the management and demanded that the door to the smoking room should be taken off completely (yes – completely removed), because they felt that the fact that the room was closed off meant that there was a sort of “division” between the staff. No matter that the non-smokers also had their own little sitting-room where smoking wasn’t permitted (why, one had to wonder – if we didn’t already know the answer – didn’t they just form their own little division in there?). This was back in the day when anti-smoking was only just becoming “a thing,” so the management duly obliged and removed the door so that non-smokers felt more comfortable going into the smoking room and sitting down with the smokers for a coffee and a chat. It was always rather odd that back then, the vast majority of people chose to come and sit in the smoking room, even the non-smokers, whereas the non-smoking room remained largely empty, even though it was a much nicer room. Sometimes you couldn’t even get a seat for all the non-smokers hogging them. My own frequent suggestions that non-smokers should be banned from the smoking room every time I went in and had to stand up, because there wasn’t sufficient space for them, didn’t go down very well with the non-smoking seat-hoggers, needless to say! Whenever I pointed to the near-empty non-smoking sitting room, they’d all say “But everyone’s so boring in there,” and “all they do in there is sit and read the paper or work,” and “it’s much more fun in here!”

    Fast-forward a few years and – you guessed it – those very same anti-smokers (now that anti-smoking had become much more “expected”) then started demanding that the door be put back on again, because of all the smoke billowing out every time someone went in!

    Fast-forward a few years more and, of course, the smoking room had to go completely on 1 July 2007. But did all the smokers then trudge obediently into the non-smoking sitting room for their break? Did they heck! They either go off-premises or go back to their desks in preference. The non-smoking sitting room (which is still there) remains as empty and soulless as it always was, none of the smoking staff (or even many of the non-smoking staff) ever bothering to take their breaks there, apart from the few anti-smokers who started all the door-on/door-off complaints all those years ago and, yes, all they still do in there is read the paper or work or look at their phones. In many ways it’s like a little micro-view of the pub scenario – where all those anti-smokers simply didn’t “get” the fact that smokers and tolerant non-smokers simply don’t want to spend time with anti-smokers (who do tend to be something of a “type,” don’t they?) and would, quite frankly, rather miss out on a proper sit-down break altogether in preference to spending a sit-down break with a bunch of people whose company they’d really rather not share.

  7. Dirk says:

    Caught smoking in a Brussels cafe? In 9 out of 10 cases it remains without consequence

    This night VRT NEWS went along with inspectors from the FPS Public Health in 88 Brussels cafés. What turned out to be? in 42 percent of the cafes people smoked indoors. The cafés will be fined, but if they do not pay the fine, nothing will happen in 91 percent of the cases. The Brussels public prosecutor’s office disregards 91 percent of the files. Remarkably much more than in Flanders (52 percent) and in Wallonia (51 percent). This is evident from figures that VRT NEWS could see.

    A sense of impunity …

    Why is the smoking ban in Brussels much less respected than in the rest of the country? “There is a sense of impunity in Brussels,” we often heard. “In the rest of the country, pub owners risk fines of up to 8,000 euros, or even a closure of their case, but in Brussels, operators feel they will not be punished.”
    … that appears to be correct

    That feeling now appears to be true. Member of Parliament Stefaan Van Hecke (Green) asked figures on the prosecution policy of the Brussels public prosecutor at the beginning of September, but collided with Minister of Justice Koen Geens . Geens argued that the public prosecutor’s office does not communicate about what they are prosecuting and that due to a shortage of staff there is no room to answer numerical questions from members of parliament.

  8. Fumo ergo sum says:

    At last some good news to hear. Perhaps I should reconsider my negative attitudes toward our capital after all. I also heard from a colleague at work, who lives in Brussels, that he could easily light up his favorite smoke in his local cafe without fearing any sanction from the cafe owner. He told me that the cafe owner actually allows his customers to smoke indoors out of respect for the inhabitants in the neighbourhood who prefer to enjoy a good night’s sleep: he would rather face the risk of getting caught and fined instead of other people around being deranged by noisy smoking customers ‘in exile’. As a result, everybody in the street continues to live in (relative) harmony with one another, as it should be, and as it had always been in Belgium before 2011.

    • Fumo ergo sum says:

      Speaking about Brussels… Meanwhile, on a strange and remote exoplanet orbiting my front door in a radius of a mere 45 kilometres (28 miles): https://euobserver.com/environment/146761

      Which is excellent news for Brussels’ smokers, of course, because if they all stay indoors in their cafes and keep the windows closed, their environmentally hazardous smoke cannot escape in the atmosphere. A win-win situation for everybody.

  9. beobrigitte says:

    I didn’t know that the Greens want to

    Support the transition to plant-based diets by phasing in a tax on meat and dairy products over the next ten years, to reduce the 5% of the UK’s carbon emissions that come from the methane produced by livestock.
    I didn’t realize that methane lark is in fashion again. Back in the early 80s this was what set my mother off – against the Greens and climate change.

    There is a lot wrong with the European Parliament, and I shall be gutted if the UK is still in the EU the next time I visit Brussels, but the accommodation of smokers within the main Parliament building should be applauded.

    Really? What’s there to applaud about that? It looks to me like a public urinal. And a glass public urinal in which people can be watched while they’re urinating.
    Whilst I agree it looks not very inviting (anti-smoking lobby design) it still is WARM as it is INSIDE. We who live in Britain have no such luxury, hence Winter months are smoker-isolation months.
    I tend to visit my family in Germany during these months. And go to the pub I spent a lot of my young years in. Naturally the ashtrays are still on the table and the pub is doing still well. Problem is, you get there late you won’t get a seat on a table in there!

    So, yes, I thoroughly object to this. What they should have instead is a place about ten times bigger, with tables and chairs, and posters on the walls, and curtains in the windows, and a bar at one end with a welcoming bartender and lots of bottles behind him. A bit like this:
    https://cfrankdavis.files.wordpress.com/2019/11/smoky_bar_somewhere.jpg?w=640&h=374

    It looks empty enough to get many seats on tables anytime.

No need to log in

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.