Bad News From Austria

Smoking Lamp draws attention to bad news from Austria:

Austria passes smoking ban, snuffing out fallen government’s flagship policy 

VIENNA (Reuters) – Parliament on Tuesday passed a ban on smoking in Austria’s bars and restaurants, extinguishing a flagship policy of the recently collapsed right-wing government which had scrapped the measure after it was already on the statute books.

Smokingscot adds:

The law comes into force in November. However their election to chose the next coalition government is in September.

If the same party that opposes the ban does garner enough votes to get into government they have made it clear the law will be repealed.

What surprises me about this is how quickly a new smoking ban was re-introduced after the Austrian coalition government collapsed on May 20. It only took the new “government of experts” about 6 weeks to rush in a smoking ban:

Until fresh elections, likely to be held in September, the posts vacated by all the resigning FPÖ ministers will be filled by “by experts or senior civil servants”, Kurz said.

But what else can one expect from “experts”?

I think another very interesting thing is that overturning an Austrian smoking ban was a “flagship policy” of the fallen government. If so it suggests that there’s a very strong pro-smoking movement in Austria.

Might that have something to do with the fact that antismoking Adolf Hitler was born in Austria, and many Austrians have no wish to emulate him?

I suspect that if the smoking ban goes into effect in November, and Austrians experience the full divisive effect of them, it will result in a great many more of them switching to the “nationalist populist” political Right, as is happening elsewhere in Europe. And Austrians may find No Smoking signs going up, only to promptly be torn down again.

Also from the comments, Rose reminds us of how Tobacco Control works:

” …….. For the next few months, strive to ensure there are positive media stories, letters to the editor, etc., that tout how well the bylaw changes are working. There will no doubt be a backlash from smokers in the beginning until they get used to the changes. In the meantime, you have to counter their negative comments in the media, in comment sections of online news pieces and blogs, on radio call-in shows, etc. Your job is to make politicians continue to believe that they did the right thing. It is not unheard of for councillors to backtrack on their decision and water down legislation. (page 48)

…….. Plant stories in the media about non-smokers politely asking smokers to move to a designated smoking area or outside the smoke-free area and smokers complying. Create the impression that the bylaw is working and it will! (page 48)”

Smokers never “get used to the changes.” There is no “backlash from smokers in the beginning”: the backlash slowly builds up over time, precisely because smokers never get used to smoking bans.

Tobacco Control must be destroyed.

About Frank Davis

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12 Responses to Bad News From Austria

  1. slugbop007 says:

    I founs this gem in The Atlantic this morning:

    After Russian President Vladimir Putin told the Financial Times that Western-style liberal democracy is “obsolete,” Trump said he thought he understood the point, saying, “if you look at what’s happening in Los Angeles, where it’s so sad to look, and what’s happening in San Francisco, and a couple of other cities, which are run by an extraordinary group of liberal people.”

    slugbop007

  2. Timothy Goodacre says:

    Austria is very smoker friendly. Most adults smoke. Go out in Vienna at night. It is very friendly and everyone smokes and has a good time. Cigs are abt 5 to 6 euros a pack. I can get the premium George Karelias ‘Excellence’ for 6.5 euros a pack. Needless to say in nanny state Britain you can’t get them at any price.

    • beobrigitte says:

      One of my offspring used to live near Innsbruck where you couldn’t get a table in an restaurant in the smoking room whilst the same size non-smoking room was empty.

      I do remember, though, that the anti-smoking lobby was even back then working hard and already managed that e-cigarettes could only be sold in pharmacies (health warning as a freebe thrown in).

      I still have hope that the Austrians will not to have to suffer the smoking ban.

  3. beobrigitte says:

    I suspect that if the smoking ban goes into effect in November
    Yes. rumours have it it will come into effect on 1.11.19, spoiling the Austrian’s Christmas and Apres Ski parties.

    Every country/state that was dictated the smoking ban picked Summer to calm the smokers down.
    There is no “backlash from smokers in the beginning”: the backlash slowly builds up over time, precisely because smokers never get used to smoking bans.
    It will be interesting to see what the Austrians make of the smoking ban starting in Winter. That sure will speed up the backlash.

  4. Joe L. says:

    What surprises me about this is how quickly a new smoking ban was re-introduced after the Austrian coalition government collapsed on May 20. It only took the new “government of experts” about 6 weeks to rush in a smoking ban

    No kidding. It’s as if reinstating the smoking ban was the first thing on their agenda. Why was it such a priority? I assume there was a significant amount of money awaiting the new government officials courtesy of the UN/EU/WHO. This is an unfortunate setback for free choice. We can only hold out hope for the September election.

    Tobacco Control must be destroyed.

    • Frank Davis says:

      It’s as if reinstating the smoking ban was the first thing on their agenda.

      It certainly looks that way. But equally it looks like the outgoing government (brought down by a sting operation, it seems) had preventing a smoking ban as the first thing on their agenda. Or was Reuters wrong in reporting that this was their flagship policy?

      It suggests to me that Austrian smokers will be very angry if they have a smoking ban imposed on them. I think they’ll be much angrier than most smokers are when confronted with these bans. They’ll feel cheated. But that’s just my guess.

  5. Smoking Lamp says:

    Tobacco control is an obsession with the antismoker activists and Pharma partners that coerce governments and bribe politicians to impose these totalitarian, over-reaching smoking bans and suppress the data that challenges their justification. Tobacco control must be destroyed!

    • Joe L. says:

      Thanks for the link, Rhys. Looks like it’s time to cancel my Netflix subscription. Netflix has become increasingly biased toward content based on Progressive ideology. This is the final straw.

      Interesting to note that 13 of the 14 comments on this article are from people who are unhappy with Netflix’s decision to reduce depictions of smoking. Another clear example that smoking isn’t as denormalized as Tobacco Control pretends it has become. Comment sections on smoking-related articles tend to lean heavily toward free choice unless they have been astroturfed–the difference between the two is stark.

      One other positive takeaway from this article is that the MPAA is refusing to follow Netflix’s lead in kowtowing to Tobacco Control, stating that their ratings system “is not designed to impose societal change or censor filmmakers”:

      Meanwhile, the MPAA has rejected calls for movies to receive an R rating if they show anything beyond limited tobacco use. “While the [ratings] system strongly weighs the presence of any tobacco-related imagery, it is not designed to impose societal change or censor filmmakers,” MPAA chairman and CEO Charles Rivkin wrote in a letter last year to senators who had urged the industry org to revise its ratings policies related to smoking depictions.

  6. EG says:

    When I think about smoking I have to admit that I prefer a second hand smoke over me smoking. I know it sounds weird but I was in the underground passage and there was a man with his guitar and he was smoking a cigarette and I could smell it till I got up the stairs. It smelled heavenly. I walk behind people who are smoking because I can catch some of it. I wonder if anyone else feels this way?

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