A Game of Musical Chairs

The current Conservative leadership election seems to be a sort of game of musical chairs.

Each candidate brings with him his own chair. The chairs are then arranged in a line or a circle, and one of them is removed. When the music starts, the candidates start running around the chairs. And when the music stops, they all sit down on the the nearest chair, and one of them is left standing. The one left standing then departs from the game. And another chair is removed, and the music starts again. In the end there are only two candidates left running around one chair, and the one that manages to sit on it is declared the winner.

So, unlike in a first-past-the-post election, candidates are removed in a slow process of attrition. Instead of one vote, there are about as many votes as there are candidates, and musical chair elections take an awful long time. Which is why the Conservative leadership election is taking such a long time.

Nevertheless, a lot of pundits think that Boris Johnson has more or less won the election, because he’s the runaway leader in the race around the chairs.

He also happens to be my preferred candidate, if only because he (or rather his secretary Melissa) sent me a number of books and a large cigar some 10 years ago. I think that a Boris Johnson premiership would be, if nothing else, rather fun.

He’s said he’ll deliver Brexit. But will he? Theresa May said she’d deliver Brexit, and didn’t. In fact, I think she never had any intention of delivering it, while pretending that she did. It could be that Boris Johnson will prove to be no different.

I remain of the opinion that we’re never going to see the Brexit we voted for, because the political class who are supposed to serve us in fact regard us as their servants, and they’re not going to pay attention to any vote of ours. We are to do what they tell us to do, not vice versa. For what was the smoking ban for which most of them voted other than their imperious demand for the British people to stop smoking? They think they know better than we do what’s good for us. And remaining in Europe is what most of them think will be good for us. And so we will remain in Europe. And even if Boris Johnson does his level best to leave, it will be somehow arranged that we remain.

An example of this sort of high-handed decision-making can be seen in outgoing premier Theresa May’s recent announcement:

Desperate to leave a ‘legacy’ for her disastrous premiership, Theresa May has decided to bring in a legally binding Net Zero climate target, which forces the UK to eliminate all emissions of carbon dioxide by 2050.

As far as I can see, this will mean internal combustion engines being phased out over the next 30 years, and replaced with electric motors. It’s sheer lunacy, but the political class have nearly all signed up to the modern dogma of climate change, and They Know Better.

What we’re really facing is a crisis of representative democracy. We’re now living in a political society in which our representatives no longer represent us, but instead owe their loyalty to supranational organisations like the EU. Politics is becoming Government versus People. And it’s become the task of the people to oust our arrogant existing governing political class, and replace it with something that actually represents them and speaks on their behalf. And that’s something that is easier said than done. And it’s something that needs to be done not just in Britain, but everywhere else in Europe. It’s going to be populist conservatives versus progressive elites. And it’s already started happening.

And if the populists win, there’s a good chance that we might get our smoky pubs and bars back again, because smoking bans are really part of a top-down-controlling global elitist project. If we can recover some sort of representative democracy, it’s very unlikely that this elitist project will continue.

Quite where Boris stands in all this, I don’t know. We’ll find out fairly soon. But we might hope hear a bit of rousing Churchillian rhetoric from him, judging by this analysis of Churchill’s speeches:

About Frank Davis

smoker
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10 Responses to A Game of Musical Chairs

  1. wobbler2012 says:

    I’m with you Frank I resigned myself to the fact that we are not going to get a proper Brexit ages ago. The only good thing to come from that is that it may well accelerate the demise of these bastards that little bit quicker.

  2. beobrigitte says:

    I think that a Boris Johnson premiership would be, if nothing else, rather fun.
    My current favourite is Rory Steward simply because he is against smoking bans and I would hope he would kick out the anti-smoker lobby and amend this draconian ban we have had live with for nearly 12 years.
    But then, Boris Johnson at the helm sure would be refreshingly interesting.

    As far as I can see, this will mean internal combustion engines being phased out over the next 30 years, and replaced with electric motors. It’s sheer lunacy, but the political class have nearly all signed up to the modern dogma of climate change, and They Know Better.
    And WHERE are the “They-Know-Better” getting the amount of electricity required for this from?
    Coal? Nuclear? (the Thorium option is out, even though it is cheap, little waste and no melt-downs) Oil? Gas? Shale? (I’m not sure if putting cracks into the very rock we’re living on is such a good idea.)
    Or will there be a car ban for the average citizen? I guess the “They-Know-Better” pay no attention to the side effects of eliminating all emissions of carbon dioxide by 2050. They don’t even think about 2050, they think about their brief spell in power and where they could retire to in comfort. Or do a Tony Bliar – charging heftily for a (useless) 20 minute speech.

    Brexit is beginning to baffle me. Sure, I do not think that will be a no deal Brexit. (Can’t damage businesses and deals made). Brexit will take years and years and years and years.
    The only initial change will be as from October 2019 the average citizen will be allowed to bring back from the continent only 250g tobacco. Brexit will not rid us from the anti-smokers, quite the opposite.

    • RdM says:

      “I do not think that will be a no deal Brexit.”

      From afar, it would seem to me that no deal is the best deal.

      https://www.melaniephillips.com/as-whitehall-systematically-sabotages-brexit-two-civil-servants-blow-the-whistle/

      Read it all, it’s a long page, but a small sample:

      Far from “No-Deal” (or as it should more correctly be termed, a return to full sovereignty trading under WTO rules) being a disaster or a “cliff-edge” scenario, it is looking more and more like the best deal on offer. It provides complete certainty under international law and conventions to which the UK has long subscribed. It prevents endless prevarication and delay while years are wasted trying to hammer out terms with an intransigent EU. And it delivers Brexit in full – no multi-billion pound divorce settlement, an immediate release from the jurisdiction of the ECJ, no requirement to follow EU rules over which we have no say, no border in the Irish Sea, no customs union, no EU control over our economy, agriculture, fisheries, no risk of new EU taxes being imposed on a UK that will have no ability to vote them down.

      You write further
      “The only initial change will be as from October 2019 the average citizen will be allowed to bring back from the continent only 250g tobacco.”

      While in NZ here that used to be the rule, now it’s gone down to 50g …
      But I’m curious;- while it’s probably good to stockpile anyway, what’s the evidence, the basis for this assertion? Has it actually been declared that this will be a new law?

      Thanks and cheers!

      • beobrigitte says:

        While in NZ here that used to be the rule, now it’s gone down to 50g …
        But I’m curious;- while it’s probably good to stockpile anyway, what’s the evidence, the basis for this assertion? Has it actually been declared that this will be a new law?

        This:
        Currently, there is no defined limit on the quantities of alcohol and tobacco that British citizens can bring back from the EU, provided:

        Travellers transport the goods themselves
        The goods are for personal use or to be given as gifts
        The traveller has paid duty and tax in the country of purchase.
        although, UK government guidelines do suggest the following upper limits per person:

        Wine: 90 litres (128 bottles)
        Beer: 110 litres (193 pints)
        Spirits: 10 litres
        Cigarettes: 800

        is PRIOR to Brexit.
        https://www.eurotunnel.com/uk/brexit/will-duty-free-be-introduced-following-brexit/

        What makes anyone think that Brexit is giving us the riddance of anti-smokers meddling in british laws?

        • jaxthefirst says:

          I rarely travel abroad, and usually get my non-smoking friends to bring back some duty free tobacco on their travels. However, I get the impression that the “no limit” rule is almost universally disregarded by most customs officials in the UK and that most people stick to the 200 cigs/250mg of tobacco in any case, because that’s what the “guidelines” say and they therefore think (wrongly) that that’s the law. And of the few people who know that that’s not the law, most simply can’t be bothered with the hassle and grilling that they know they’ll get coming through customs if they try and bring any more back. So although in theory we’ll lose that ability to bring “unlimited” amounts of booze and tobacco into the UK, in practice it’ll make almost zero difference.

        • RdM says:

          Brigitte, your link provides no immediate answer to my question, but does show 3 gov.uk links at the end.

          The first, about what if no-deal brexit, second about importing from within EU, third about importing (to the UK) from non-EU countries…
          Only there do you get mention of a 250g limit.
          https://www.gov.uk/duty-free-goods/arrivals-from-outside-the-eu

          But the future scenario (especially with a “no-deal” WTO rules exit) is the reverse.
          It’ll be non EU UK importing from the EU (or elsewhere, by choice).
          A mirror image, if you like.

          It seems to me that those rules aren’t established yet.
          Right to fear TC meddling, but also time to campaign that it remains as before, unlimited.

          Well, I wish you the best!

          As you know, it’s even more idiotically limited here, and you don’t want that there! ;=})

  3. RdM says:

    I had to dig up that older Melanie Phillips post from my bookmarks, and I really am a long way from UK politics, but going to the home page a couple of newer links seem relevant:

    https://www.melaniephillips.com/leaderhip-contest-real-british-conservative/
    https://www.melaniephillips.com/alternative-bojo-not-conservative-wing/

    But I hardly understand, don’t have much of a feel for it, and there’s enough in NZ to contend with, particularly re the anti-smokers & etc. Still, for what it’s worth …

  4. DP says:

    Dear Mr Davis

    Came across this on Facebook:

    https://www.facebook.com/steve.bell.39/timeline

    At the top today, so further down later, and much further down much later.

    I don’t recall Mr Bell being a commenter here. Is he the same Steve Bell, cartoonist for the Guardian? I like his work, despite it being in the Guardian.

    DP

  5. jaxthefirst says:

    On the Net Zero carbon target, I thought it was unfortunate that the very day after Mrs May had made this Great Announcement, there was yet another Great Announcement – about a massive expansion of Heathrow airport to incorporate a new runway, move the M25, shift a few rivers to the right a bit (or the left? Can’t remember) and move a whole host of villages elsewhere so that they can vastly increase the number of flights using Heathrow. So that’s going to knock the zero-carbon-by-2050 aim off course a bit, I’d have thought. Perhaps they’re hoping that by then they’ll have zero-emissions flights zipping about all over the world. (Yeah, right). Strangely, though, not one single reporter of this huge expansion questioned it in connection with Mrs May’s zero-carbon-by-2050 pledge …. funny that, no?

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