UK February Heat Wave

We’re having a very warm February in the UK:

UK weather today: Met office confirms it’s the hottest day in February on record

The temperatures had got all the way up to nearly 15 17º C. It had me wondering whether there was something to all this global warming nonsense after all.

But it seems that if it’s warm in one place, it’ll just be cold somewhere else:

Los Angeles is officially experiencing the coldest February in nearly 60 years, according to the National Weather Service, as the city has endured a series of storms and is bracing for more later this week.

And

An ice tsunami was spawned on Lake Erie by a massive windstorm which has resulted in the loss of power for thousands in the area. The ice storm took place Sunday across parts of New York and along Lake Erie, pushing large chunks of ice along lakeshore areas.

So on balance it looks like maybe there’s no net global warming after all.

Yesterday I headed off to a local pub (something usually unthinkable in February), parked the car in its empty car park, walked to the front door,… and found it was locked shut. I shouldn’t have been too surprised, because pubs probably don’t expect many smokers in their gardens at this time of year. On a slow Monday, why not just close the pub for the day?

I’ll try again today. It’s a novel experience to sit outside in warm sunshine on a February day.

One day I’ll be able to sit inside again. And it might be sooner than I imagine. Because we’re seeing a global revolt under way. People are taking back their countries. It’s happening in the USA. And it’s happening in Europe as well. It’s a mounting re-affirmation of traditional values in the face of “progressive” new ones. And what’s more traditional than being able to sit in a pub with a pint of beer and a cigarette or a pipe?

About Frank Davis

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9 Responses to UK February Heat Wave

  1. slugbop007 says:

    In Montréal, Quebec, Canada we are having one of the coldest days ever in February: -26 degrees Celsius. Lucky you.

    slugbop007

  2. Smoking Lamp says:

    The sooner smoking bans are repealed the better!

  3. Smoking Lamp says:

    Meanwhile the Antis are increasing their call for total prohibition of cigarettes (meaning all tobacco by the time they’re done)… See “Should cigarettes be banned?” https://www.syracuse.com/health/2019/02/should-cigarettes-be-banned.html

    There is a poll (currently 60% against a cigarette ban).

  4. garyk30 says:

    It is easy to show heat waves when you start from a point that is the coldest it has been in 2,000 years.

    • RdM says:

      Well, read through the intro with patience, and then see the graphs, an read further:
      https://foresight.org/some-historical-perspective/

      The last, longest time scale one looks very like Frank’s simulation.

      Read the rest.

      • Frank Davis says:

        Very nice essay.

        By far the possibility I would worry about, if I were the worrying sort, would be the return to an ice age — since interglacials, over the past half million years or so, have tended to last only 10,000 years or so.

        Exactly what I think.

        But I didn’t know what he meant by “nanotech” and why it was so important.

    • Rose says:

      It certainly is.
      Records started in 1850 and Krakatoa blew up in 1883 making them even worse as a start point.

      Mind you if they’d started keeping records even earlier.
      The Year Without a Summer 1816
      https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/the-year-without-summer/

      “Snow in June, freezing temperatures in July, a killer frost in August: “The most gloomy and extraordinary weather ever seen,” according to one Vermont farmer.
      Two centuries ago, 1816 became the year without a summer for millions of people in parts of North America and Europe, leading to failed crops and near-famine conditions.

      While they didn’t know the chill’s cause at the time, scientists and historians now know that the biggest volcanic eruption in human history, on the other side of the world — Mount Tambora in Indonesia in April 1815 — spewed millions of tons of dust, ash and sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere, temporarily changing the world’s climate and dropping global temperatures by as much as 3 degrees.

      In addition to food shortages, the natural climate change caused disease outbreaks, widespread migration of people looking for a better home and religious revivals as people tried to make sense of it all.”
      https://eu.usatoday.com/story/weather/2016/05/26/year-without-a-summer-1816-mount-tambora/84855694/

      Still, I suspect that most people won’t have noticed that, Gary.

  5. Colin Smith says:

    Here in Cambridge, I remember a February weekend in 1998 where people were wearing T-shirts – and that was two weeks earlier in the year than this.

    According to this page: http://www.torro.org.uk/maxtemps.php
    .. the hottest February day ever in Cambridge was 19.7 degrees in 1891. It has not reached that temperature here this year.

    If records are being broken in London, we can all imagine how the constant building and expansion of the city are changing the urban heat island effect. And the air over London (and the UK in general) is now a lot less smokey than it used to be.

    From:
    https://www.ucsusa.org/global-warming/science-and-impacts/science/aerosols-and-global-warming-faq.html

    “Aerosol particles of human origin can have a net effect of diminishing the energy that arrives at the Earth’s surface. Scientists estimate that particles produced by human activities have led to a net loss of solar energy (heat) at the ground by as much as 8 percent in densely populated areas over the past few decades. This effect, sometimes referred to as ‘solar dimming,’ may have masked some of the late 20th century global warming due to heat-trapping gases.

    Human activities that result in production of both reflecting and absorbing aerosol particle have been curtailed by legislation and modern technology in many places. The ‘pea soup fogs’ that so bedeviled London in Sherlock Holmes’ day, for example, were caused by particles produced by incomplete combustion of coal for heating. These ‘fogs’ in London are now a thing of the past, thanks to mandatory scrubbers and other advanced combustion techniques.”

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