Bye Bye Sally

These days we live in a world in which we are being told that everything is poisonous.

It started with tobacco. We’ve been being told for about 100 years that tobacco companies are “merchants of death”. We’ve been being told that they’re selling us a poison that will kill us.

But tobacco was just the start of it. For we’re now being told the same thing about alcohol. In addition to the tobacco companies trying to kill us, we learn that the brewers and distillers and wineries are also trying to kill us.

Do as I do, think about cancer before you have a glass of wine, says chief medical officer

Dame Sally Davies urges the public to follow her example, and think about the risks of cancer before deciding whether a glass of wine is worth it

And it doesn’t end there. For we’re also being told that meat and fat and sugar and chocolate and salt are killers too.

Walk into any bakery and you’ll find on sale all manner of cakes and buns and loaves. And all of them lethal. All of them carefully designed to kill you softly with each sweet mouthful.

And it’s not just food and drink that’s killing you. Every single car on the road is a death trap, and they all spew out thousands of tons of soot and carbon monoxide and, worst of all, carbon dioxide which is causing the Global Warming that is going to boil us all slowly to death.

We are told that oil companies and coal mines are almost as murderous as tobacco companies. And so are all the other industries churning out nothing but poison.

You can’t trust anyone, it seems. You can’t trust politicians. You can’t trust bankers. You can’t trust experts. And all news is now “fake news”.

Is it any wonder, in such a poisoned world, in which more or less everything is lethal, that there are people desperately searching for “safe spaces?”

Dame Sally Davies, who [no longer] happens to be Chief Medical Officer, is telling us that we can’t trust the food industry to sell us healthy food. And yet she wants to be trusted herself. Isn’t that what she’s doing when she “urges the public to follow her example”? Isn’t she saying “Trust me. And don’t trust any of the food and drink manufacturers I’ve been denouncing”?

But why should you trust someone who clearly has little or no trust in anyone else? Dame Sally Davies has been teaching distrust of entire industries. And if such distrust is taught by teachers, can it be any surprise if the teachers themselves become distrusted.

And, oddly enough, perhaps that’s exactly what has happened to her.  BMJ 8 February 2019:

Sally Davies steps down as England’s chief medical officer

Maybe it was just that her hypocrisy caught up with her in the end:

Britain’s top doctor has been terrorising moderate drinkers into giving up wine and lecturing women to consider every sip of alcohol a deadly step towards breast cancer.

But it appears Dame Sally Davies – the UK’s ‘nanny in chief’ who only this week urged others to ‘do as I do’ – has relaxed her killjoy approach to booze at home.

New photographs show the chief medical officer clutching a half-full champagne flute in the lounge of her £3 million London townhouse.

Will her replacement be any better? Probably not. After all, her predecessor was Sir Liam Donaldson, CMO from 1998 to 2010. Remember him? He was one of the prime movers for the UK public smoking ban and the swine flu fiasco.

Sir George Godber

Sally Davies is really just one of a long line of killjoys, the greatest of whom was none other than Sir George Godber, CMO from 1960 to 1973, and about whom I’ve often written. And about whom there is more here and here and here and here.

So bye bye Sally, and good riddance. I wonder if there’ll be a bronze bust of you in the RCP like the one of Sir George Godber?

P.S. James Delingpole on Sally Davies.

About Frank Davis

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10 Responses to Bye Bye Sally

  1. Mark Jarratt, Canberra, Australia says:

    Dame Sally must have drained as much public money as she was going to get, money stolen from smokers by the puritanical anti smoking racketeering grifters.

  2. Rose says:

    How the mistrust of food began.

    Kessler had a book out and after his success turning a common plant chemical into an addictive drug he used his tobacco template on food.
    As I’ve said before, they all follow the leader like a row of little ducklings, just as they did with Godber, even using the same phrases.

    How the Food Makers Captured Our Brains
    2009

    “As head of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. David A. Kessler served two presidents and battled Congress and Big Tobacco. But the Harvard-educated pediatrician discovered he was helpless against the forces of a chocolate chip cookie.

    In an experiment of one, Dr. Kessler tested his willpower by buying two gooey chocolate chip cookies that he didn’t plan to eat. At home, he found himself staring at the cookies, and even distracted by memories of the chocolate chunks and doughy peaks as he left the room. He left the house, and the cookies remained uneaten. Feeling triumphant, he stopped for coffee, saw cookies on the counter and gobbled one down.”

    “Why does that chocolate chip cookie have such power over me?” Dr. Kessler asked in an interview. “Is it the cookie, the representation of the cookie in my brain? I spent seven years trying to figure out the answer.”

    During his time at the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Kessler maintained a high profile, streamlining the agency, pushing for faster approval of drugs and overseeing the creation of the standardized nutrition label on food packaging.

    But Dr. Kessler is perhaps best known for his efforts to investigate and regulate the tobacco industry, and his accusation that cigarette makers intentionally manipulated nicotine content to make their products more addictive.
    In “The End of Overeating,” Dr. Kessler finds some similarities in the food industry, which has combined and created foods in a way that taps into our brain circuitry and stimulates our desire for more.”

    “Dr. Kessler isn’t convinced that food makers fully understand the neuroscience of the forces they have unleashed, but food companies certainly understand human behavior, taste preferences and desire.”

    “Food companies “design food for irresistibility,” Dr. Kessler noted. “It’s been part of their business plans.”

    “Nobody has ever explained to people how their brains have been captured.”
    http: //www.nytimes.com/2009/06/23/health/23well.html

    Previously

    US ruling turns smokers into junkies

    “Nicotine is addictive, a panel of experts on drug abuse decided last week. The decision leaves the door open for the US Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco as it does other addictive substances.

    Over the past few months, the FDA’s commissioner, David Kessler, has been campaigning for tobacco to be regulated in the same way as many other drugs. To do so legally, he must demonstrate that nicotine is a powerful drug, and that the tobacco companies depend on nicotine’s addictiveness to keep smokers smoking.”
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg14319381.300-us-ruling-turns-smokers-into-junkies.html

    Next stop taxes, bans and adulterated food, it happened to tobacco and it’s just as starting to happen tio food in the UK.

    • petesquiz says:

      “Food companies “design food for irresistibility,” Dr. Kessler noted. “It’s been part of their business plans.”

      Dr Kessler obviously doesn’t understand how business works…every product ever sold has been designed to be the best at whatever it is supposed to do! How do people like this get into positions of responsibility?

  3. Rose says:

    What’s the cheap and cheerful answer to ill-informed Government meddling?

    Additives
    “Prior to 1970, the use of additives in tobacco products was prohibited without special permission from the Commissioners of Customs and Excise, under Section 176 of the Customs and Excise Act, 1952. This permission was given only within very strict limits and mainly in respect of flavourings in tobacco products other than cigarettes. The prohibition extended to the importation of tobacco products containing additives as well as a ban on the production of cigarettes with additives for export.”

    “The rise of additives in tobacco products is intimately linked with the strategy to reduce tar yields. The amount of tar and nicotine in smoke is measured by a standard smoking machine in which the cigarette is smoked with a fixed puff volume and frequency with tar and nicotine residues collected on a filter and weighed. Governments have insisted on reducing tar levels as measured by this approach, hoping that this would reduce tar exposure to smokers — and therefore lead to reduced harm.

    “The tobacco industry argues that one of the key purposes of additives is to make lower tar cigarettes more palatable. The ISCSH accepts this and notes:
    “Some smokers find existing low and low to middle tar brands unsatisfying, but if those who smoked middle or middle to high tar cigarettes could switch to low tar brands whose acceptability was improved by additives, the dangers of smoking could be reduced.
    The Committee recognises the potential value of using flavouring additives in this way.”

    Low tar cigarettes and additives
    “One of the prime justifications for the addition of artificial flavourings is to replace the lost flavour of the diluted smoke. This has in theory been done to facilitate the switch to low-tar. However, any hoped-for health benefits from low-tar cigarettes have largely failed to materialise. At the same time an extremely lax regulatory regime for additives has emerged. Although smokers of lower tar cigarettes may be consuming as much tar and nicotine in total, they will be consuming greater volumes of diluted smoke to do it.”
    http: //old.ash.org.uk/html/regulation/html/additives.html
    Authorization Required

    Artificial sweetners
    “The war on sugar is making ground. On Friday, the sugar tax on soft drinks will come into effect, hitting any that contain more than 5g of sugar per 100ml. The manufacturers will have to pay a levy of 18p a litre to the Treasury, or 24p a litre if the sugar content is over 8g per 100ml. Some drinks prices will rise. Many will not, because the drinks manufacturers have found ways to get the sugar levels down, usually with artificial sweeteners.

    But that’s not all. Food companies were instructed a year ago by PHE to cut the sugar in their products by 20% by 2020, and 5% in the first 12 months – hence the birth of Milkybar Wowsomes. It is voluntary, but the industry is under no illusion that if it doesn’t co-operate, the government will do something more brutal – probably imposing another sugar tax, this time on what we eat.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/apr/02/time-to-stockpile-irn-bru-how-sugar-tax-change-nations-favourite-drinks

    Incidentally
    Sugar and the Brain

    “Glucose, a form of sugar, is the primary source of energy for every cell in the body. Because the brain is so rich in nerve cells, or neurons, it is the most energy-demanding organ, using one-half of all the sugar energy in the body.

    Brain functions such as thinking, memory, and learning are closely linked to glucose levels and how efficiently the brain uses this fuel source. If there isn’t enough glucose in the brain, for example, neurotransmitters, the brain’s chemical messengers, are not produced and communication between neurons breaks down. In addition, hypoglycemia, a common complication of diabetes caused by low glucose levels in the blood, can lead to loss of energy for brain function and is linked to poor attention and cognitive function.

    “The brain is dependent on sugar as its main fuel,” says Vera Novak, MD, PhD, an HMS associate professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “It cannot be without it.”
    http://neuro.hms.harvard.edu/harvard-mahoney-neuroscience-institute/brain-newsletter/and-brain-series/sugar-and-brain

    Now I’m going to have to spend extra time checking food labels to see if a product has been contaminated with artificial sweeteners before I buy.

    • beobrigitte says:

      Now I’m going to have to spend extra time checking food labels to see if a product has been contaminated with artificial sweeteners before I buy.

      I check food labels religiously for artificial sweetener – since I started doing this I have no headaches and less migraine attacks, hence little Ibuprofen or Migraeleave use required. The “processed prepared foods” scare bypasses me as I cook from fresh although, when I’m really hungry, I eat whatever I’m given. And every now and then a “Chippie-dinner” is a wonderful treat. After all, I’m an adult and I spend MY money on MY food and drink.

  4. beobrigitte says:

    Do as I do, think about cancer before you have a glass of wine, says chief medical officer

    Dame Sally Davies urges the public to follow her example, and think about the risks of cancer before deciding whether a glass of wine is worth it …

    Why would anybody want to think about cancer when drinking a glass or two of wine to forget about all health scares? Thinking about Dame Sally Davies and her scare tactics drives one to drink!!

    … But it appears Dame Sally Davies – the UK’s ‘nanny in chief’ who only this week urged others to ‘do as I do’ – has relaxed her killjoy approach to booze at home.

    New photographs show the chief medical officer clutching a half-full champagne flute in the lounge of her £3 million London townhouse.

    Celebrating the end of professional lying to the public or celebrating her bank balance after a few years in office?

    Will her replacement be any better?
    Nope. Unless all healthists along with the anti-smokers are kicked out.

  5. Charles Burns says:

    Now seeing Facebook articles about “FIVE DEADLY FOOD COMBINATIONS!!” that include as “DEADLY!!” dishes like bacon and eggs, meat and potatoes, cereals with milk.

  6. Pingback: The Bullying Bastards in Tobacco Control | Frank Davis

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