Q Clearance

Dick Puddlecote:

The hold that ‘public health’ has over politicians is astonishing, but then it’s because politicians are weak, cowardly, and ultimately incredibly stupid, as I have mentioned before.

Well, that’s one possible explanation: Politicians are weak, cowardly, and incredibly stupid.

How did so many weak, cowardly, and incredibly stupid people come to fill the ranks of the leadership of Britain? Did they hold some sort of competition to find Mr Really Stupid?

It’s not just Britain. The politicians are the same everywhere, as far as I can see. There are only one or two who buck the trend. Trump, Farage are a couple of names that come to mind.

Furthermore, not having ever been either Britain’s Prime Minister or Chancellor of the Exchequer or any other minister, I have no idea what it’s like to occupy any of these roles. But I imagine that you’re probably being pushed and pulled and tugged and nudged all day, every day. You may also be being threatened and blackmailed.

Furthermore, since you’re a “leader,” you’ll automatically belong in some command structure. You’ll have a rank, and a restricted range of responsibilities. There’s only so much that you can actually do.

Someone like our PM Theresa May may actually be a puppet on a string, or a puppet on a set of competing, rival strings, all pulling her more or less strongly in one direction or other. And what she actually does at any one time is to move in the direction of the resultant of all these competing forces.

This is exactly how my orbital simulation models work: the Sun and planets all exert gravitational forces on each other, and each one turns and speeds or slows in response to the resultant sum total of all the forces acting upon them.

And who knows whether there are Rasputins, exerting huge influence, in the mix as well? In the reign of tsar Nicholas II, Rasputin was the only person who could help his haemophiliac son Alexei, and he began to exert greater and greater influence inside the Russian court. According to some accounts, Rasputin was taking a great many decisions of state by the time he was finally assassinated.

Heinrich Himmler was another person who reportedly fell under the influence of his personal physiotherapist, Felix Kersten, who was the only person who could relieve him of the agonising stomach pains he often suffered.

Isn’t it true, of all power structures everywhere, that there are these rival forces at work, forming an uneasy balance of power.

In the USA, it’s been pointed out that Donald Trump is surrounded by generals. Does he command them, or do they command him? There’s also an epic power struggle going on inside US politics, with Trump under investigation by Robert Mueller, and calls being made for Mueller to himself be investigated.

What’s going on? Nobody really seems to know. Is Trump winning, or is he losing? Will he be re-elected, or will he be impeached? There is a sense that almost anything could happen next.

In this circumstance of deep uncertainty, people search for someone – anyone – who seems to know what’s really going on.

And that’s what’s behind the strange phenomenon of Q, or QAnon, an anonymous individual (or maybe group of individuals) who posts enigmatic messages on an internet message board (read them here), and who now even has his name advertised on billboards across the USA (see right).

What’s going on? How more weird does it get? You couldn’t make this stuff up, even if you tried. It’s the sort of thing you might find in a John Le Carré spy story.

Here’s the plot:

Embattled US President Donald Trump is fighting for survival against the forces of the US Deep State, which includes almost the entirety of the US mainstream media. Trump needs to find some way to get his message out to the American people, by getting around the mainstream media who are systematically bad-mouthing him all the time. To this end, he enlists Q, someone from Military Intelligence with Q Clearance to read all the intelligence gathered by all US intelligence agencies (and there seem to be one heck of a lot of them). Q knows everything, and even accompanies the President on Air Force One, and posts enigmatic photos from inside it.

According to Q, there is an elaborate Plan being slowly and painstaking played out in order to outwit the Deep State. According to Q, Attorney General Jeff Sessions – whom Trump appointed, but who promptly recused himself from the Mueller investigation, and who a lot of people think is asleep at the wheel – has been been very busy issuing sealed indictments of thousands of people across the USA. Furthermore, according to Q, both Robert Mueller and his boss Rod Rosenstein are secretly working for Trump. They’re just doing a great job of fooling everybody into thinking they’re investigating him, when actually they’re not. If everything goes according to the Plan, a lot of people will find themselves on trial for treason in military courts sometime later this summer, just in time for Trump’s Republicans to win big at the upcoming November midterm elections.

But not everything seems to be going according to plan. In an interesting plot twist, a couple of months ago Q mistakenly posted his own password on the message board he was using, and was promptly impersonated by opponents, and had to shift to a different message board, and rebuild his credibility all over again. And not everyone believes that the new Q is the same person as the old Q. Author Jerome Corsi was an avid follower of Q for several months, but now regards him as being “compromised”. Alex Jones never believed in Q at all.

It’s all very like Watergate, with Q playing the role of Deep Throat. It’ll make a great movie one day. It’s got everything. It’s got the essential Russian and British secret agents, and it’s got the essential busty blondes as well. It’s a new spy novel that’s being written before our eyes.

And maybe that’s why there are billboard ads for Q. Maybe the movie is already being shot. Maybe the plum roles have already been assigned, and the scenes are being shot as the script comes in. Maybe it’ll open in cinemas across the USA in November this year. Or get streamed on the internet.

About Frank Davis

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14 Responses to Q Clearance

  1. Timothy Goodacre says:

    All i know is that these venal UK politicians are weak and easily influenced by the disgusting public health fascists and they should butt out of our lives. We used to be a proud nation of individuals coming together in times of crisis. Now we are totally hobbled and pander to minorities who should crawl back to their sewers.

  2. waltc says:

    Wasn’t Q the guy in the Bond books who invented the cars with ejector seats and the pens that shot darts?

    OT
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/07/04/paris-authorities-try-stub-french-smoking-habit-public-parks/

  3. Rose says:

    What Causes Ex-Smokers To Relapse? Loss Of Identity, Study Says
    Jul 6, 2018

    “For many ex-smokers, losing the cigarette could also mean losing an integral part of their social identity. And attempting to recapture that may be a common reason why people end up relapsing, according to new findings.

    The study titled “Redefining smoking relapse as recovered social identity — secondary qualitative analysis of relapse narratives” was published in the Journal of Substance Use on July 2.”

    “When people attempt to quit smoking, what they are really doing is attempting to bury part of their old identity and reconfigure a new one,” Dr. Notley said.”

    “But when they lose their smoker identity, it may also be accompanied with losing a group membership of sorts. They may have to give up social circles and connections they built over a long period. At times, the groups they have been a part of since their teenage years.

    As a result, craving their lost social identity (i.e. their smoker identity) may often be the driving force behind ex-smokers picking up a cigarette again.”
    https://www.medicaldaily.com/what-causes-ex-smokers-relapse-loss-identity-study-says-425559

    • garyk30 says:

      “May also…may have….may often!

      Lots of ‘mays’ and not one single ‘smokers do’.

      Supposition and guessing do not a valid argument make.

      • garyk30 says:

        RANDOM QUOTE:
        That which can be asserted without evidence, can be dismissed without evidence – Hitchens

      • not one single ‘smokers do’.

        Just the one occurrence, in fact: what they are really doing is. But that comes after: could also mean…, may be…; and before: may also be…, may have to…, and a final may often be.

  4. Tony says:

    How did so many weak, cowardly, and incredibly stupid people come to fill the ranks of the leadership of Britain?

    It seems to me that there’s a strong pattern. If they’re anti-smoking they’re also healthists, global warmists and europhiles etc. They appear to me to lack critical faculties.

    I don’t really buy the notion of a global conspiracy. Except in that it is so easy for a rich powerful person or organisation to get a controlling influence. If anything it makes me wonder why there aren’t several competing organisations. Perhaps there are.

    I’m not claiming any great insight here but this is how an organisation could create a political (or other) drone and get them into power. Looks very easy.

    1. Get hold of someone ambitious and bubbly or even charismatic but rather shallow and not very bright.
    2. Train/brainwash them to believe in you and trust you implicitly. Become their best friend.
    3. Where possible, while still junior and very dependent on you, involve them in something dodgy. Especially give them secret knowledge of illegal activity such as a paedophile ring. I can’t believe that so many politicians appear to be paedophiles and this scenario would help explain the numbers. (see also https://underdogsbiteupwards.wordpress.com/2018/07/02/justice-and-vigilantes/)
    4. Give them help in their career. Money, influence etc. Bear in mind that you’re running this person’s career at a loss. So your people in other companies can repeatedly give them special deals. They will be star performers and so will get rapid promotion.
    5. Once in useful post reassure them of your neutrality and emphasise that they can turn to you for strictly confidential advice at any time. Any subject. They’ll be way out of their depth almost all the time and so will gladly follow orders to the letter.
    6. If they start to get difficult. a. Remove support or even give them bad advice. They’ll get themselves into trouble very fast. b. If needs be blackmail them in respect of the dodgy activity you got them involved in. c. As a last resort, threaten violence against them and their family up to and including murder.

  5. John Watson says:

    A little off topic perhaps, but ASH, the BMA, the health services and the politicians are responsible for this The Health Act 2006 has contributed to this more than any other single component:
    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/lifestyle/loneliness/were-learning-more-about-how-social-isolation-damages-your-brain-and-body-—-here-are-the-biggest-effects/ar-AAzub1p?ocid=spartandhp

  6. jaxthefirst says:

    “How did so many weak, cowardly, and incredibly stupid people come to fill the ranks of the leadership of Britain? Did they hold some sort of competition to find Mr Really Stupid?”

    No, it’s an unfortunate but inevitable consequence of appointing someone to a senior post, and then “outsourcing” all the important bits of their jobs elsewhere, which means in turn that they never get to make the important decisions – either badly (in which case either the public or the party will fairly swiftly remove them) or well (in which case the people or the party will hang on to them). It’s one reason why they’ve all been running about like chickens with their heads cut off since the Brexit vote – it’s the first time that they’ve actually had to address a matter of huge national significance all by themselves, without being able to run to the EU to sort it out for them – and this has highlighted many and varied inadequacies and incompetencies which have hitherto been hidden.

    Most of our MPs simply haven’t – even now – got the slightest grasp on how complex and difficult the issues are which have to be faced, and even those few who have started to understand it are genuinely running scared, because they know that they simply don’t have the ability to cope sensibly with something of this scale. That’s why the reaction of pretty much all MPs to “the Brexit question” has been one of three: the hard Brexiteers have kept repeating the mantra that we can simply cut all of our ties with Europe, pull out with no deal and cope perfectly well with the cliff-edge Brexit which would result (an idiotic, bordering-on-crazy, viewpoint which is anyone with an iota of sense must surely see would spell economic disaster for the UK); the hard Remainers keep batting on with their own mantra that we can change our minds and say “we didn’t really mean it” to the EU and that they’d welcome us back with open arms and everything would be just as hunky-dory and perfect as it was before the Referendum (another bordering-on-delusional, idealistic viewpoint – if it was so perfect for everyone, why did they think so many people voted to leave?); and the remainder seem to have simply buried their heads in the sand and ploughed on just as before, endlessly taking up Parliamentary time with their own daft little single-issue hobby-horses, and pushing through stupid, insignificant and unnecessarily specific laws (“upskirting,” anyone?), possibly because they know this is their last chance to do so before they are required to start doing a real MP’s job (which they know they are incapable of), and acting as if there isn’t anything more important for them to do (like our departure from the EU, for example).

    In short, by signing away to Brussels huge swathes of the jobs that MPs are actually supposed to do, we’ve paved the way for a bunch of people with the small-minded attitudes of parish councillors to be promoted to positions way above their station and way beyond their capabilities, and, most importantly, to get away with it. We’ve awarded significant power and influence to people who, being small-minded and self-oriented egoists with a far higher opinion of themselves than they deserve, have abused that power in order to indulge themselves in their own little fantasies of being able to mould the world into way that they, personally, desire it to be.

    That is, in a nutshell, the main reason why I voted to leave the EU and, even if given countless more chances, would vote in exactly the same way every time. I know not many people voted Leave for that reason – in fact, I don’t know anyone else who did – but I just felt that the only way we were ever going to get a Parliament populated with people who had the mental capacities and the breadth of vision to – well, err – run a country rather than seeing election to Parliament as an opportunity to bring out their own personal little soapbox and shout about their own personal little pet project, was to take those jobs back from the EU and give them to our elected representatives. And, yes, I was fully aware that that meant that we’d be putting a massive task in the hands of a bunch of people who, to be frank, probably weren’t up to the job, and that it’d be a chaotic mess (as it has been), but I felt that as the level of competence has declined with every passing Parliament that we’ve had since we’ve been in the EU, the chances of the calibre of our MPs magically improving if we stayed in any longer was, to say the least, vanishingly small. A much more likely scenario was that they would get even worse! But, as any good manager knows, you don’t improve the performance of any poorly-performing subordinate by simply taking tasks away from them so that they have less and less to do! “The devil makes work for idle hands” and all that. And our membership of the stealthily power-stealing EU, and the consequent decline in the quality of our own Members of Parliament must surely be the most stark example of the truth of that oft-used saying.

    It’ll take time, of course, because we’re stuck with the present incumbents for a while yet, but I am hopeful that as they are forced to address real issues of genuine national importance (and, almost certainly in the case of virtually all of them, they’ll muck it up, because those issues are beyond their limited capabilities), the present, hopeless lot will come to realise that the days of making a stand on silly little issues like dog poo on footpaths, or the colour of cigarette packets, or whether there’s a Macdonald’s within a mile of their local primary school are over, and they’ll lose interest and resign, or they’ll be booted out by their electorates for being generally useless or deselected by their parties, and, hopefully, replaced by a new generation of MPs who – having watched the whole unhappy saga unfold – will have a much better grasp on what the job of being an MP actually entails and an awareness of the responsibility that it brings to represent voters in a genuinely democratic, rather than an overbearing authoritarian, way. Being elected as an MP should be regarded as a privilege, not as a green light to do just as you please. Hopefully, future generations of MPs will come to recognise this – but that’ll only happen once the real job of being one is returned squarely back to our own Parliament.

    • Rose says:

      Wonderfully put, my thoughts entirely. When at last they have a real job to do, they won’t have time for petty meddling with the personal lives of the public..

    • Frank Davis says:

      Very nicely observed, as ever.

    • junican says:

      My thinking was similar, but with more emphasis on the connections of the EU with the WHO, IPCC, and the elite of the UN generally. If we are to transfer ‘sovereignty’ to the UN, then we can do directly, without loads of intermediaries.
      Drain the swamp!

      • jaxthefirst says:

        Yes, Junican, I too share your concerns about the wider connections beyond the EU but if I’d taken things down that route the comment would probably have been twice as long, and I thought that by the end of my little rant I’d said quite enough to bore everyone senseless for one day! A further discussion for another day, methinks ….

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