The Chain

I’m still trying to get my head around something I read a day or two back.

“Chain migration” definition:

Chain migration is a term used by demographers since the 1960s to refer to the social process by which immigrants from a particular town follow others from that town to a particular destination city or neighborhood. The destination may be in another country or in a new, usually urban, location within the same country.

Chain migration can be defined as a “movement in which prospective migrants learn of opportunities, are provided with transportation, and have initial accommodation and employment arranged by means of primary social relationships with previous migrants.”[1] Or, more simply put: “The dynamic underlying ‘chain migration’ is so simple that it sounds like common sense: People are more likely to move to where people they know live, and each new immigrant makes people they know more likely to move there in turn.

Seems simple enough. Chain migration is something that’s probably been going on in places like the USA since the time of the Pilgrim Fathers in 1630. When your brother or your uncle was already living there, it was easy for you to migrate as well. And once you were living there too, it was easier for your sister or your mother to follow in your footsteps. One migrant pulls other migrants behind him, and they draw in yet more migrants. That’s how the “chain” works.

“Chain-smoking” works the same way. The first cigarette is used to light the second cigarette, and second cigarette is used to light the third.

But when Donald Trump mentioned “chain migration”, this was Senator Dick Durbin’s response:

“When it came to the issue of, quote, ‘chain migration,’ I said to the president, do you realize how painful that term is to so many people? African-Americans believe they migrated to America in chains and when you talk about chain migration, it hurts them personally. He said, ‘Oh, that’s a good line.'”

That’s crazy. That’s just barking mad. Durbin seems to be saying that you shouldn’t use words like “chain” in front of African-Americans, because it will instantly remind them of slavery.

Maybe you shouldn’t use words like “slave” either? Or “master”? Or “plantation”?

I wondered what a real African-American like Thomas Sowell would have thought of this. I think he’d probably have burst out laughing.

It seemed to me that it all said much more about Dick Durbin than Donald Trump or African-Americans. It’s probably only the Durbins of the world who get triggered by words like “chain”. Because it’s white male Americans like Durbin who are still feeling guilty and ashamed of slavery in the USA prior to about 1850.

Maybe that’s what the “liberal” mindset is all about: guilt and shame. Shame over the misdeeds of past generations.

It’s not just slavery they’re ashamed about. They’re ashamed about everything. And here in the UK I guess we’re supposed to feel ashamed of the Industrial Revolution, and the British Empire, and probably about 300 other things as well.

Everyone’s got something to be ashamed about. And some people get crippled by shame and guilt. And Dick Durbin is one of them. And so also, most likely, are all the Nancy Pelosis and Diane Feinsteins. They’re all crippled by shame.

I was thinking this morning that the Roman Empire probably imploded when the Romans just started feeling thoroughly ashamed of themselves that they’d gone and conquered every country around the Mediterranean, and far beyond. And, worse still, despoiled them with cities and roads and aqueducts. And they probably sent delegations to all the places they’d invaded to apologise for what their ancestors had done.

Anyway, here’s a piece of music that Senator Durbin probably doesn’t like: The Chain by Fleetwood Mac. And in it the refrain is that they would “never break the chain”, which of course meant that the black slaves working in the cotton fields should never be set free.

 

About Frank Davis

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16 Responses to The Chain

  1. D says:

    During the 1960s Belgium sponsored so-called “guest workers” for jobs Belgians no longer wanted to do. Mainly North-Africans and Turks responded. They worked, adapted and they transferred part of their salaries to their families in their homeland. Peaceful, no worries.Then Ayatollah Khomeini came and the Islamic revolution. Then the millions of dollars from Saudi Arabia paid for influencing the children of the guest workers, and now their grandchildren. This is the Arabization, which explains the head scarves that many grandchildren of the original workers now want.

    Same thing in Indonesia. 30 years ago Bandung was a wild city with a throbbing night life. Now there’s a sea of head scarfs and all pubs/bars must close at midnight. Very difficult to get a beer, even in a supermarket. One has to go to a Chinese shop, I mean a Chinese-Indonesian, who will give you the bottles – which are not on display – as if he were selling drugs.

    • nisakiman says:

      In Istanbul in the late sixties, you almost never saw headscarves on women, but when I was there a couple of years ago, women in headscarves were in the majority. The Turkish women are trying to hold on to the secular vision of Ataturk, but Erdogan is doing all he can to wind the clock back a few centuries. Likewise when I was in Tehran and Kabul back in the 60s, it was normal to see local women wearing the latest western fashions; but no longer. They’re back to living under 14th century mores, and any woman seen in public without at the very least a headscarf is asking for trouble.

  2. Jack Ketch says:

    Call me naive but isn’t then the solution to the Calais situation to deport anyone living here illegally and get rid of things In Work Benefits that make us soooo attractive to economic refugees? Maybe stop pandering to their religions and culture ? Imprison anyone knowingly employing illegals?

    Of course after BrexSSHite economic migration to will simply cease to exist…..

  3. Rose says:

    I do so dislike people who take instant offence on other peoples behalf without consulting them first, making other people wrongly believe that whoever’s voice has been taken are overly sensitive.

    Like non-smokers for example.

    • beobrigitte says:

      Like non-smokers for example.
      Indeed. Quite a few non-smokers I have met on my travels last year feel patronized which made me laugh. I just told them to start smoking to REALLY understand what patronized means!

    • Philip Neal says:

      The purpose of contrived verbal offences of this kind is obvious – to change the subject and put the other fellow on the back foot. If the victim defends himself (“I didn’t mean to offend anybody.” “As a person of colour…” etc.) the topic instantly ceases to be immigration and becomes black people and their woes. President Trump’s recent comparison of third world countries to, er, holes works in the opposite way (“Vulgar I agree, but how would you phrase his point?”) to get people talking about what he actually meant. There is usually a purpose to his rudeness and trolling: see Scott Adams’s blog on the subject.

  4. beobrigitte says:

    “Chain migration” definition:

    Chain migration is a term used by demographers since the 1960s to refer to the social process by which immigrants from a particular town follow others from that town to a particular destination city or neighborhood. The destination may be in another country or in a new, usually urban, location within the same country.

    Chain migration can be defined as a “movement in which prospective migrants learn of opportunities, are provided with transportation, and have initial accommodation and employment arranged by means of primary social relationships with previous migrants.”[1] Or, more simply put: “The dynamic underlying ‘chain migration’ is so simple that it sounds like common sense: People are more likely to move to where people they know live, and each new immigrant makes people they know more likely to move there in turn.
    This does remind me of a video I watched a few month ago – the Italian government had signaled that NGOs (with best intentions but no ability to have a little foresight) were encouraging the people smugglers to send an ever increasing number of people to Italy in ever worse dinghies as they know the NGOs boats are 12 miles from Africa’s coast, ready to help these people and take them to Italy.

    Needless to say, there isn’t much written on the subject.
    What is causing growing Italian anger is the role of charities and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the transport of migrants across the Mediterranean. The image the charities like to present is that of desperate people putting to sea in any vessel they can lay their hands on because whatever risks they run cannot exceed the dangers of staying in their homelands. Save the Children, for example, declares in heartrending prose on its website, between photos of young children wrapped in foil blankets, that ‘children are fleeing bullets, poverty, persecution and the growing impact of climate change, only to drown in European waters’.

    The reality could not be more different. The vast majority of migrants from Libya are young men paying the equivalent of €1,000 each to people smugglers in what they see as a calculated risk to reach a better life in Europe. The business model of the smugglers does not include transporting their customers all the way to Italy, but rather to take them 12 nautical miles to the boundary of Libya’s territorial waters, so they can then be ‘rescued’ and ferried the rest of the way to Europe.
    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/07/migrants-and-madness-in-the-med/

    Senator Durbin seems to worry about the word “chain”:
    But when Donald Trump mentioned “chain migration”, this was Senator Dick Durbin’s response:

    “When it came to the issue of, quote, ‘chain migration,’ I said to the president, do you realize how painful that term is to so many people? African-Americans believe they migrated to America in chains and when you talk about chain migration, it hurts them personally.
    Does he care if the anti-smoking chain hurts smokers personally? He gives a flying ****!
    https://www.durbin.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/durbin-public-health-organizations-mark-25th-anniversary-of-smoke-free-commercial-flights
    He is just like these NGO’s cruising 12 Miles from the African coast – feeling that he does a “good” thing and closing eyes and ears to the DAMAGE he is responsible for.

    • Tony says:

      About “smoke-free” commercial flights, I happened to see this the other day.
      http://industrydocuments.library.ucsf.edu/tobacco/docs/xpdp0146
      One of the anti-smoking industry complaints about people smoking on aircraft. Note that this anti-smoker was presumably in a non-smoking area.
      “In another case, the smoke pollution became so bad that the fiight attendant had to spray the entire cabin, and the complainant, a physician, nevertheless suffered from eye, nose, and throat irritation.”
      What the hell were they spraying for God’s sake?

  5. nisakiman says:

    And in other news:

    EU Commission urges Greece to implement smoking ban

    The number of smokers in Greece has decreased over the last five years, however, the non-implementation of a smoking ban in enclosed public places has irritated the public, which calls it “cultural degradation,” writes European affairs website euractiv.com. The European Commission generally advises Greece to implement the smoking ban which was voted in but never fully implemented.

    http://www.keeptalkinggreece.com/2018/01/15/greece-smoking-ban-commission-survey/

    They keep chipping away, in the hope that Greece will fall, just like the others. All the dodgy polls saying that the Greeks really love smoking bans, and hate it because the bars still allow smoking.

    Yeah, right.

    Fucking tossers.

    • beobrigitte says:

      Nisakiman, there is one comment (I believe in reply of yours) that REALLY gets my back up as it is the biggest LIE ever told:
      Several factual errors in one post here. First, the tobacco industry with its massive financial resources delayed scientific evidence and political debate for decades, to protect their money. The anti-smoking lobby had no resources.
      The Tobacco Industry funded a huge amount of UNIVERSITY research, so all (!) Universities were delaying scientific “evidence”?
      That the anti-smoking lobby was never penniless or had no resources is a myth. They did buy their way into politics!!
      Facts remain fact – looks like there is another anti-smoker who believes in a lie repeatedly being told becomes the truth.

      • beobrigitte says:

        We need to demand transparency in all things anti-smoking.

      • nisakiman says:

        That guy is one of those people it’s really not worth arguing with. He believes he knows it all, and won’t be moved. He’s forever spouting lefty bullshit on that site, and facts make no difference – you could show him utterly indisputable proof, and he will still cling to what he believes, regardless. Such is the power of propaganda.

  6. waltc says:

    No, what “chain migration” means in America today (and for the last many years) is that once a foreigner is in residence here, legally or illegally, or if legally still not as a citizen, they can easily bring in an endless chain of blood relatives up to and including third cousins all of whom jump to the head of the line over all other applicants. These relatives can be sick, stupid, unemployable or dangerous, doesn’t matter; they’re part of the chain, and eligible for many free gov’t-provided services. What it used to mean, back when my forebears arrived in the 1880s (and right till 1965) was that resident citizens or resident immigrants could bring in close relatives (parents, children, siblings, spouses) but only if they were healthy and either employable or the sponsor signed a contract to financially house and support them for five years, or in the case of an elderly parent, forever.

    Durbin does not feel guilty about slavery any more than he actually got the vapors over hearing the word shit. This is rank exploitive mischief-making and outrage-mongering for purely partisan purposes. I riffed on this over at facebook under the parody headline, ” The shit heard round the world.”

    • Joe L. says:

      Durbin does not feel guilty about slavery any more than he actually got the vapors over hearing the word shit.

      As someone who spent my entire life in Chicago up until last year, I can attest that Dick Durbin is nothing more than a self-serving, opportunistic, bandwagon-jumping Progressive piece of shit.

  7. D says:

    Over here on the island of Bali I can still go to pubs and restaurants and smoke. Some restaurants don’t want you to smoke, but they’re a minority. All the pubs and bars allow smoking. What I am seeing is Australian tourists coming to pubs in Bali for a smoking vacation. ALL of them smoke and they meet other Aussies in pubs in Bali that cater for only Aussies. But how long will it last?

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