Clumsy People with Big Feet

Good news from Michael Siegel:

New data reported by Clive Bates and presented in Joe Nocera’s New York Times column about electronic cigarettes reveal that there has been a major change in the public’s appreciation of the severe hazards of smoking in the past three years:

According to these sources, in 2010, 80% of the public believed that smoking was more hazardous than using non-tobacco-containing, non-combustible electronic cigarettes.

However, in 2013, only 60% of the public believed that smoking was more hazardous than using non-tobacco-containing, non-combustible electronic cigarettes.

This is bad news for public health, as it indicates that within three years, the public’s appreciation of the severe hazards of smoking has been undermined. Twenty percent of the public has been convinced that smoking is no more hazardous than inhaling aerosol from a device which involves no combustion and contains no tobacco.

The reason?

For the past three years, the mainstream anti-smoking groups, as well as federal agencies including the FDA and the CDC, have been disseminating the message that electronic cigarette use is harmful and they have largely hidden from the public the fact that vaping is much safer than smoking.

I’m not surprised – but for a different reason than Siegel. He thinks it’s bad news; I think it’s good news. For I think that a lot of people have started to realise that Tobacco Control just makes stuff up. The speed at which vaping has been demonised, with near-zero research having been done, has probably alerted many people to the fact that Tobacco Control simply doesn’t want people putting tubes in their mouths and inhaling through them, regardless of what they might contain. They can’t stand cigarettes, or anything that looks like cigarettes. And as people understand this, they start to realise that the War on Smoking (and of course the War on Vaping) have no rational basis whatever. And that it’s all been one huge fraud.

In other news, H/T Harley for this news from Devon (where I lived a few years back). Leg-iron has his own take on it:

Smokers and the morbidly obese in Devon will be denied routine surgery unless they quit smoking or lose weight.

Patients with a BMI of 35 or above will have to shed 5% of their weight while smokers will have to quit eight weeks before surgery.

The NHS in Devon has a £14.5m deficit and says the cuts are needed to help it meet waiting list targets.

They’ll be adding drinkers too, no doubt. But think of all the possibilities of who else might arbitrarily be denied surgery!

Why not clumsy people with big feet? Or tall people? Or UKIP voters?

Best of all, why not rule out sick people? So that only healthy people will be allowed into hospitals? That would cut the waiting lists!

And when you light up on NYC streets, people try to bum cigarettes off you. I think Walt may have mentioned this.

I’m glad that some New Yorkers are still enraged about the ban:

“The fact that I have to be outside to begin with is so enraging,” said Fran Lebowitz, New York’s resident kvetch and perhaps the city’s most prominent smoker, “that I don’t have much ire left if someone asks me for a cigarette.”

And why doesn’t Audrey Silk encourage smoking?

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About Frank Davis

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33 Responses to Clumsy People with Big Feet

  1. harleyrider1978 says:

    Belief systems yet again……….That’s a poor excuse for real proof isn’t it!

    I guess Im the hardcore of the groups,I believe nothing until PROVEN.

    I was warned years ago by then Capt, Dr Knutzen about epidemiology being a mad science all by itself. After Koop shook us down with his Billy Sunday sermons the Capt spent 2 hours with me explaining how junk science gets created. That was the first time I ever heard the term junk science!

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Junk Science – a term used to describe false or misleading research that is offered as real science, but which was not obtained using the accepted scientific method . The term “junk science” is often applied to deceptive environmental and health studies.

      • carol2000 says:

        The accepted so-called scientific method is actually deliberate, cynical fraud, designed to deceive the public for political ends. Namely, those studies that ignore the role of infection in order to falsely blame peoples’ lifestyles.

  2. harleyrider1978 says:

    War on smoking ‘needs cash’

    The Government is not taking New Zealand’s smokefree goal by 2025 seriously enough and will not get there unless it invests more money into quit services, a Manawatu smoking cessation expert says.

    The Ministry of Health released a review of New Zealand’s tobacco control services by Shore & Whariki Research Centre last week.

    The review details tobacco control in district health board areas throughout the country, including MidCentral DHB.

    All local resources are directed to Te Ohu Auahi Mutunga Smoking Cessation services, which is aimed at Maori, Pacific or pregnant women. Those not eligible for its programmes are referred to Quitline.

    “The evidence review suggests much of what the Ministry of Health is funding is effective,” the report said.

    “However, there remains inequality in smoking prevalence, with high rates among Maori. The prevalence in the 20- to 24-year-old age group is higher than total prevalence for every DHB, and the current rate of decline. . . will not result in achievement of the goal of Smokefree 2025.”
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/63852327/war-on-smoking-needs-cash

  3. harleyrider1978 says:

    Lessons from Eric Garner’s death and cigarette taxes

    Punitive taxes boost black markets that trigger violent police crackdowns

    Much has been written about the July death of Eric Garner, the 43-year-old black man who died after a New York City police officer put him in a chokehold during an arrest.

    The New York City medical examiner ruled that Garner’s death was homicide, caused by the chokehold and compression to his chest. A grand jury will soon decide if criminal charges should be brought against officers.

    Many people say his death is another case of white police brutality against black citizens. Lost in this public debate, though, is a key question: Why were police arresting Garner in the first place?

    Was he robbing a store or attacking innocent citizens? No, police arrested Garner supposedly for selling untaxed cigarettes. The strong-arm arresting process claimed Garner’s life, all over the sale of 75-cent loose cigarettes or “loosies.”

    High taxes produce underground markets for goods and services, and when these taxes are hiked, smuggling increases. Nowhere is this illustrated more clearly than in New York City.

    In the name of cutting smoking rates, New York has the highest state cigarette tax at $4.35 per pack. New York City piles on an additional local cigarette tax of $1.50 per pack. Since 2006, the cigarette tax in New York state has been raised 190 percent. In response, cigarette smuggling there increased 59 percent. More than half of all cigarettes consumed in New York state are smuggled, according to a 2014 report by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.

    Garner chose to participate in the booming underground cigarette market as a smuggler. Since 2009, he had been arrested eight times for selling loosies, which are popular among people who can’t afford a full pack because of the excessive taxes.

    In January 2014, tough new penalties for selling untaxed cigarettes took effect in New York City. In July, emboldened by the new law, the city’s highest-ranking uniformed cop, Philip Banks, issued an order to crack down on loosie sales days before Garner died.

    These events confirm that police are ultimately the enforcers of the tax code, and every vote for higher taxes gives police increased authority to exert more force on citizens in more situations. Higher excise taxes inevitably lead to more violent clashes between police and smugglers.

    Americans have a long tradition of smuggling to avoid taxes. Some Founding Fathers were smugglers. John Hancock, for example, operated one of the largest smuggling operations in the American Colonies in order to avoid British trade taxes. Hancock smuggled glass, paper, French molasses, Dutch tea, rum, wine and tobacco.

    In some respects, the current situation is worse than Colonial times because Americans are imposing this oppressive, violent system on themselves. From black markets in cigarettes to black markets in drugs, today police ride herd over voluntary exchanges between individuals in American communities and kill smugglers on the streets. Garner was another victim of this immoral system — “collateral damage” in New York’s war on tobacco.

    New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton wants the public to think that officer retraining on arrest procedures will fix the problem. However, Commissioner Bratton and other city officials choose to ignore the true cause: Current laws create too many situations that put police in conflict with citizens over consensual, nonviolent activities.

    Eliminating punitive cigarette taxes would shrink the underground market and help redirect police resources to combating real crimes of force and violence, rather than empowering police to employ violence in the name of tax collection.

    Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/sep/12/mcquillan-the-real-lesson-from-eric-garners-death/#ixzz3KzULMuIM
    Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Walt Cody @Scott. Exactly. I think Mr. Gardner should be given an honorary place in Frank’ s Smokers Graveyard.

      https://www.facebook.com/groups/111253694071/10152554098034072/?notif_t=group_activity

      • Rose says:

        Well, I don’t.
        He was resisting arrest and that’s a whole different ball game.

        The charge was trivial and shouldn’t exist. It’s not unheard of to ask to buy a cigarette of someone else, which is a private transaction and shouldn’t attract the attention of the state..

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          Right Rose but it was a STING operation where the cops were told to go out and bust bootleggers. Which as we know was a direct result of the HIGH TAXATION………..

          Trust me this is the best thing to ever happen for us in the fight…………..Poor man dying though is tragic. But as they say never let a tragedy go by without using it for every point you can get with it. Especially when it creates public outrage against the taxes and police brutality…………….

  4. The real deficit the “GP-led” Devon NHS Care Commissioning Group is facing is £430 million over the next five years. http://www.realstreet.co.uk/2014/12/the-nhs-must-go

    “Routine” treatment denied to smokers who keep on smoking and the ‘obese’ who don’t lose weight includes cataract and hernia operations.

    I used to get lifts from a man in his 70s with cataracts in both eyes. Due to very long waiting lists ten years or more ago, out of one eye he couldn’t see anything and the other was pretty hopeless. We nearly had a crash entering a roundabout as he hadn’t seen a car which was coming round about 20 yards away. Cost-cutting will cost lives as well as leaving smokers and overweight people blinded and in pain, but they can be picked on because they’ve already been dehumanised by the media. But the ‘news’papers will spin it to read, “Smoker who refused to give up for operation killed himself and family of four in car crash.”

    Makes me wonder who the media will be instructed to attack next. They started doing it to Muslims, what, a year or two ago? Which has led to pork chops and even a pig’s head left outside mosques and full police enquiries (as they are in total political correctness mode for the time being).

    Now the flames have been turned up under smokers and the obese, but there are no taxpayer-funded ‘charities’ to defend these minorities’ “lifestyle choices”. They “cost” society X-billions a year in this, that and the other. Never a mention of what it costs smokers and the overweight in terms of high tobacco prices and large amounts of food. The ‘expert’ economists talk about costs to the NHS and the “lost productivity” allegedly due to these two “epidemics” as they are now suddenly termed.

    Simple. Let us opt out of the NHS, pay lower N.I. contributions and remove the taxes from cigarettes and the 20% VAT from takeaway food and sweets. ‘Lost productivity’ doesn’t matter in a country with millions unemployed and underemployed.

    To show that these ‘experts’ at the WHO deal in fraud, an ‘epidemic’ is concerned with the rapid spread of infectious disease in a short period of time over a given area. You could have a “crime epidemic” but the medical term refers to communicable diseases.

    Anyway, smoking and obesity would not be epidemics but pandemics as they affect nigh on the whole world and this word refers again to infectious diseases.

    But we know the WHO and NHS and Obamacare run on fraud and coercion. This means that anything is possible in future. Imagine a scenario and it’ll probably happen. Involuntary euthanasia on your 65th birthday? Some ‘experts’ openly talk about older people being a “burden” on the NHS. I wonder how much tax they’ve paid in a lifetime and seen it thrown away on fake wars, foreign despots’ private jets, £50+ million a day to Brussels (which would pay Devon NHS’s 5 years of deficit off in 8 days) and most ironically, houses, benefits and healthcare for anyone who comes to the UK.

    • I suffer from involuntary italicisation. There are no quotations in the last two paragraphs. I will probably be denied NHS treatment because of it.

      In fact – and I meant to put this above – I have been denied treatment, but not due to smoking or ‘obesity’ but something else which I haven’t revealed yet but which I have been discriminated against for – for the past two years. Legal action is almost guaranteed.

      It’s why I know that people in the medical profession are mostly self-important, arrogant, ignorant, amoral, overpaid idiots whose number one concern is preserving their overblown salaries and pensions. Some are actually petrified of breaking the smallest Department of Health diktat.

      My remaining friend from the ‘church’ I used to attend tells me of the times he asks questions to NHS staff only to be informed that he can’t be told due to privacy rules, even asking after another fellow churchgoer after church. Approx. half of the adults at that church work for the NHS. I once asked one of the four GPs there if a good friend of mine – a well-known alcoholic in the town who used to visit me almost every day after I befriended him – had died five days previously like I had heard (but the person who informed me wasn’t sure if it was ‘my’ John or the other John at the hostel.

      Anyway, this GP refused to tell me because his brothers (who had practically disowned him) hadn’t been found. Eventually I had asked enough questions for him to have to admit that he had died.

      But the best one goes to my last-remaining church friend who went up to the surgery to pick up a friend to drive her home. He asked the receptionist if the woman was out of consultation yet only to be told that she could not divulge this information due to privacy rules.

      They are only obeying orders and they revel in them. It’s why the top dogs have no scruples about letting people go blind and killing others on the road if it saves enough money to preserve their fat salaries.

      • harleyrider1978 says:

        Its a system bent on total collapse……..

        • prog says:

          All the talk of smokers costing the NHS huge a huge amount conveniently ignores the obscene amount they pay to The Treasury – £12,000,000,000 pa. Granted, this is not paid directly to the NHS, but ultimately it’s still an additional £12 billion that would have to be raised in some other way if smoking was totally banned. I doubt any smoker (given the level of brainwashing) would not agree that all receipts should be diverted to treat so called tobacco related illness in order to more than compensate for claimed cost to the NHS.

          Was the NHS in crisis when going on half of adults smoked? It’s the ageing population that costs the most to treat and care for, yet we’re constantly being told that we must adapt our lifestyles to reduce the financial burden by increased longevity. It’s obvious really – the longer you live, the greater the cost of lifetime health care. It is, at least, a good enough reason to raise the retirement age by at least 5 years. Despite, perhaps, raising another few billion pa, that is never really mooted – it being a perfect vote loser. Forcing people to work for longer would also mean there’d be less reason for mass immigration of foreign workers and accompanying increase in the population – thus reducing the overall strain on the public purse.

      • Frank Davis says:

        I suffer from involuntary italicisation.

        I can treat the disorder.

        But only if you stop quoting Yuri Bezmenov…;)

  5. Lepercolonist says:

    “I’m not surprised – but for a different reason than Siegel. He thinks it’s bad news; I think it’s good news. For I think that a lot of people have started to realise that Tobacco Control just makes stuff up. The speed at which vaping has been demonised, with near-zero research having been done, has probably alerted many people to the fact that Tobacco Control simply doesn’t want people putting tubes in their mouths and inhaling through them, regardless of what they might contain. They can’t stand cigarettes, or anything that looks like cigarettes. And as people understand this, they start to realise that the War on Smoking (and of course the War on Vaping) have no rational basis whatever. And that it’s all been one huge fraud.”

    I concur that it is good news.

    Concerning the incompetent buffoon, CDC Director Thomas Frieden

    From the National Review:

    With his face plastered for weeks on every TV set in America, CDC director Tom Frieden is suffering from an advanced case of media overexposure. While meant to reassure, his clinical demeanor and calculated speech patterns as he explains the U.S. Ebola outbreak often come across as patronizing — even smug.
    No doubt that smugness factored heavily in the Obama administration’s Friday decision to fire Frieden as the face of the federal Ebola response. Replacing him is “Ebola czar” Ron Klain, a Democratic hack with decades of experience in the political shark tank. President Obama expects Klain to alleviate the public’s fear without talking down to people — a skill that seemed to elude his predecessor.
    Frieden’s style should have come as no surprise to the White House. As undisputed captain of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg’s nanny state, Frieden made his political career by lecturing, pressuring, and outright coercing people into making healthy “choices.” From tobacco to trans fats to table salt, the ex–New York City health commissioner took a “papa knows best” approach to public health, confidently exercising control over the most basic aspects of millions of peoples’ lives.
    Not content with banning smoking virtually everywhere, Frieden spearheaded a massive cigarette-tax spike in 2002, raising  the city’s rate from eight cents per pack to $1.50 and creating the most vibrant black market for tobacco products in the nation. He even suggested that tobacco companies be nationalized, with the feds distributing cigarettes to proven addicts and banning them for everyone else.
    Freiden continued his anti-tobacco crusade as CDC head, this time targeting e-cigarettes, nicotine vaporizers free of unhealthy and cancer-causing chemicals. While lacking any medical evidence, the doctor’s position  on this new technology is just as uncompromising: E-cigs will “reglamorize cigarettes” and inevitably lead struggling smokers to return to the cancer sticks, thus causing “more harm than good.”

    Frieden’s patronizing attitude during the Ebola crisis comes as little surprise. Since 2002 the doctor has made a career out of condescension, moving from one excessive regulation to another in his attempt to equate private choices with public health.

    Pertaining to Hancock County, West Virginia :

    Now that Frieden has some spare time, I wonder if he can explain to Mountaineer management and (soon to be laid-off employees) that this total smoking ban is in their best interest ? Without talking down to them ?

  6. harleyrider1978 says:

    Now we got TABLESAW lawsuits claiming defects if they didn’t have certain safety features involved. The awards were 1 and 1.5 million by 2 jury awards………..Yet this is suppose to be enuf money for a stupid lawfirm to run TV ads to get saw victims to sue!

    This fucking world has gone upside down.

    I have 3 table saws and one a delta unisaw/cabinent professional saw that’s as exact as to a thousands of a dialed degree and all the bells and whistles…………The one Norm has on the New Yankee Work Shop and I bought it for a song 200 cash and I put a single phase motor to it.

    Ive had an accident or two,but it was always my own fault for being to tired to be running it like a dumbass. But I still have all my fingers!

    You should see some of the furniture Ive made thru the years!

  7. harleyrider1978 says:

    Celebrate the 81st Anniversary of Repeal Day at the Cato Institute

    By Kat Murti

    On December 5, 1933, the 21st Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, ending our nation’s failed experiment with alcohol prohibition. Yet, 81 years later, modern-day prohibitionists continue to deny the laws of supply and demand, attempting to control what individuals can choose to put into their own bodies.

    The War on Drugs is a glaring example of contemporary prohibitionism, but nanny-staters have even attempted to ban substances as innocuous as “too-large” sodas or gourmet cheeses.

    This Friday, join the Cato Institute for a look at prohibition 81 years after the repeal of the 18th Amendment.

    http://www.cato.org/blog/celebrate-81st-anniversary-repeal-day-cato-institute?utm_content=buffer5fb4b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

  8. harleyrider1978 says:

    Rand Paul blames Eric Garner’s death on high NYC cigarette tax

    In 2010, the New York State Legislature passed a law raising taxes on cigarettes purchased in New York City to $5.85 per pack of 20 cigarettes.

    cnn.com|By Sara Fischer, CNN

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/03/politics/rand-paul-eric-garner-taxes/index.html?hpt=po_c1

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Washington (CNN) — In 2010, the New York State Legislature passed a law raising taxes on cigarettes purchased in New York City to $5.85 per pack of 20 cigarettes.

      Fast-forward four years: A U.S. senator is blaming the politician that created that law for the chokehold death of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, by a white police officer in New York City in July 2014.

      “I do blame the politician,” Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, explained on MSNBC’s “Hardball.” “We put our police in a dangerous situation with bad laws.”

      Garner died after a police officer put him in a chokehold while trying to arrest him for selling tax-free cigarettes. The police officers at the time were unaware of Garner’s pre-existing health conditions that likely helped lead to his death.

      On Wednesday, Paul said Garner’s death would have been prevented if the law creating New York City’s high cigarette taxes — the highest in the country — wasn’t created.

      “I think it’s also important to know that some politician put a tax of $5.85 on a pack of cigarettes,” Paul said. “So they’ve driven cigarettes underground so as not to make them so expensive.”

      The likely Republican presidential hopeful continued, “But then some politician also had to direct the police to say, ‘Hey, we want you arresting people for selling a loose cigarette.’ And for someone to die over you know breaking that law — there really is no excuse for it.”

      • harleyrider1978 says:

        “I think it’s also important to know that some politician put a tax of $5.85 on a pack of cigarettes,” Paul said. “So they’ve driven cigarettes underground so as not to make them so expensive.”

        Then in July at senate hearings in Washington dc

        Senate hearings in July showed the same ill effects of the 1920s in todays world of smoking bans and High Taxation with MASSIVE BOOTLEGGING and lost revenues with heavy enforcement costs.

        ” The high tax burden on tobacco results in de facto prohibition of the products, bringing all the undesirable outcomes associated with alcohol prohibition in the 1920s. In our research we have found evidence of substantial tobacco smuggling from low to high tax jurisdictions, violent crime, theft of tobacco and tobacco tax stamps, corruption of law-enforcement officers, and even funding of terrorist organizations through crime rings.”

        People are smoking more now than ever as your anti-smoking world collapases around you.

        Tobacco Taxation and Unintended Consequences: U.S. Senate Hearing on Tobacco Taxes Owed, Avoided, and Evaded

        July 29, 2014

        By

        Scott Drenkard

        Drenkard Statement to U.S. Senate Finance Committee July 2014

        Hearing on Tobacco: Taxes Owed, Avoided, and Evaded
        Before the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance

        Chairman Wyden, Ranking Member Hatch, and members of the Committee:

        I appreciate the opportunity to submit this statement on tobacco taxes and their impact across the country. In the 77 years since our founding in 1937, the Tax Foundation has monitored tax policy trends at the federal and state levels, and our data and research are heavily relied upon by policymakers, the media, and the general public. Our analysis is guided by the idea that taxes should be as simple, neutral, transparent, and stable as possible, and as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, we take no position on any pending legislation.

        We hope that the material we provide will be helpful in the Committee’s consideration of the issue.

        Executive Summary

        Tobacco taxes are the highest they have ever been in the United States. The federal rate currently stands at $1.0066 per pack of cigarettes, and state and local rates add as much as an additional $6.16 per pack (as in Chicago, Illinois). These combined rates are equivalent to a tax in excess of 200 percent in some locales.

        The high tax burden on tobacco results in de facto prohibition of the products, bringing all the undesirable outcomes associated with alcohol prohibition in the 1920s. In our research we have found evidence of substantial tobacco smuggling from low to high tax jurisdictions, violent crime, theft of tobacco and tobacco tax stamps, corruption of law-enforcement officers, and even funding of terrorist organizations through crime rings.

        The Mackinac Center for Public Policy estimates that 56.9 percent of the cigarettes consumed in New York State in 2012 were smuggled into the state from other locales. Other states with substantial smuggling problems include Arizona (51.5 percent), New Mexico (48.1 percent), Washington (48.0 percent) and Wisconsin (34.6 percent).

        In addition to smuggling authentic cigarettes from low to high tax jurisdictions, criminals sometimes skirt the legal market altogether and counterfeit name brand products and state tobacco tax stamps. Cigarette counterfeiting is a highly profitable international business that exposes consumers to products with increased levels of dangerous chemicals like lead and thallium. Other sources report finding insect eggs, dead flies, mold, and human feces in counterfeit cigarettes. One source estimates that the Chinese cigarette counterfeiting business produces 400 billion cigarettes per year.

        In 1994, federal cigarette excise taxes in Canada were cut from $16 to $11 per carton because cigarette smuggling had grown so pervasive.

        • prog says:

          Raking it in ultimately takes precedent over saving lives, Harley. Always has, always will, something the puritans/abolitionists don’t understand.

  9. harleyrider1978 says:

    Out of the blue

    Im watching Scandals of the ancient world about the pharaohs when out of the blue for about 4 seconds they show the pharaoh SMOKING A PIPE! and lighting it up with his concubines all around! This is from 5000 years ago to boot!

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      The question is how did that tid bit get put on TV in this world of Nazi intimidation……….Did a producer say fuckem Im doing it or what,but Ive seen similar things all over the place of late in documentaries showing smoking as normal and just!

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      He was smoking Opium…………….thru a pipe mixed with some type of herbs

      • harleyrider1978 says:

        Lord I was so wrapped up in the pipe smoking it turns out the mummies even had high levels of nicotine in their samples as well as cocaine and they even found tobacco in tombs!

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          Back up on the tobacco in the tombs part,it was museums they claim used tobacco leaves to put on the mummies to resist insects in museums………..but it doesn’t explain deep tissue toxicology tests they found nicotine at high levels in the mummies……….I saw the slip It said 300-900 3n under nicotine testing………..

  10. harleyrider1978 says:

    They pulled the story I busted there asses so bad

    Sorry…

    We can’t find the page:

    http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/health/ashington-mum-who-lost-baby-8228374

    The file could not be found for a number of reasons such as the file being moved or deleted. Please check your spelling and if you still can’t get to the right page try either using the Search Box below or heading to the homepage for a look around.

    If you still have problems, try emailing feedback@chroniclelive.co.uk and we’ll do what we can to help you. Click here to get back to where you came from.

  11. Lepercolonist says:

    Pertaining to the upcoming smoking ban in Hancock county, West Virginia :

    There is no official database of jockey injuries and fatalities, but according to a study published in the The Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine in 2013, a total of 152 jockeys died as a result of both flat and jump racing or training incidents in the U.S. between 1940 and 2012.
    Even more jockeys are permanently crippled while racing

    Jockeys understand the risks and are willing to race after serious injuries. Should we ban this dangerous activity ? It’s a bad example for the childreeeen. Let’s ban it and shut down the horse racing industry ? Of course not. The jockeys have the freedom to choose.

    Why do we avoid risks in life ? So we can make it to death safely ?

    We know the dangers of automobile accidents and yet we put our children in the back seat. Life is full of risks. We should have the freedom to choose.

    Let’s ban all contact sports due to concussions. Or should athletes have the freedom to choose ?

    Can I smoke a cigarette at a racetrack ? Not at Mountaineer after July 1st. No freedom to choose. The health ‘experts’ will dictate how to live our lives.

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Leper its a political problem not a health one as we all know to well.
      The answer is in open rebellion to the health edict and likely the racetrack will aid in that venture…….What they gonna do pull the racetracks gambling liscence. They have no authority. Id bet you right now the track is working the political avenues as we speak….

      They have much more clout than just us alone………..Id be looking at state revenue losses due to lost attendance at the track and bars…………..

      Compiling data and then proceeding to the state capitol with said info in tow and knocking on doors. You might try the Farmers insurance group for a lobbiest to.

  12. Lepercolonist says:

    You are correct, Harley. It is political now. Maybe Charlestown can get something done.

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