They All Still Keep Dying Anyway

A snapshot from Dick Puddlecote:

wordsworthbloke

It’s the same sort of thing as the BMJ editorial on Climate Change.

WHO has shown important leadership on climate change but has stopped short of declaring a global public health emergency. This may be understandable with Ebola raging. But it is what WHO should now do. Deaths from Ebola infection, tragic and frightening though they are, will pale into insignificance when compared with the mayhem we can expect for our children and grandchildren if the world does nothing to check its carbon emissions. And action is needed now.

I think they’re crazy. They inhabit a separate reality to mine. How did that happen? Because I remember when we used to share the same reality.

I was thinking today that, in the first half of the last century, vaccines and treatments were found for a great many infectious diseases, and the result was that people started living quite a lot longer. Rising living standards helped that too.

And that made the medical profession redundant. Or rather, instead of finding themselves treating people with polio, typhoid, diphtheria, and so on, as they had been since time immemorial, they found themselves treating diseases of old age, like dementia and cancer.

And people were still dying. So they had to stop thinking about the old diseases, and start thinking about new diseases – diseases of which they’d not got much experience or understanding. And so they started treating these like they were infectious diseases that could be prevented, just like the old ones. And they started looking round for causes. And somehow or other they pretty soon decided that they were all due to eating, drinking, smoking, etc. And so instead of measles and cholera epidemics, we have tobacco and obesity “epidemics”, which were just as serious, and just as much in need of doctors to treat them.

And maybe one day there will be vaccines and treatments for dementia and cancer. But I don’t think they’ve found them yet. Leastways I’ve never heard of a dementia jab, or a cancer jab.

I think they’re groping in the dark. I don’t think eating and drinking and smoking are the real culprits at all. I think they’re just “the usual suspects” that have been rounded up to make a show of being in control.

I don’t think they even understand why people age.

I don’t think they know very much about anything. Ageing. Cancer. Dementia.

When I was young, I was taught that “threescore years and ten” was pretty much the maximum lifetime I could expect. And these days I’m pretty nearly there. And that’s still what I expect to be my lifetime, even if male life expectancy in the UK is something like 78 years.

And I find it odd that, just when people do actually seem to be living longer, instead of being grateful and celebrating that fact, we’re being urged to try to live even longer. And as a matter of the greatest urgency! No more “Live fast, die young.” It’s becoming a crime to die young.

Perhaps it comes down to losing our religion at more or less the same time. A hundred years ago, most people believed (or seemed to believe) that after they died they’d enjoy an afterlife of some sort.  And that made the prospect of death bearable, and in fact maybe even welcome. But now that most people don’t believe (or don’t seem to believe) in an afterlife, the prospect of death has become unbearable, and something to be fought tooth and nail, even if that means giving up smoking, drinking, eating meat and sugar and salt, and taking up jogging.

But they all still keep dying anyway. Maybe I’d feel differently about it if lots of these diet and fitness freaks actually did live a lot longer than smokers and drinkers like me. Like if they were typically living to the age of 150, while jerks like me only made it to 70. But I’ve never heard of anyone making 150.

Anyway I’m not sure that I’d want to live forever. The kind of life where you get born, live for a while, and then die, is a life between two distinct book-ends. And that is how most all books are written: they have a beginning and an ending. What kind of story is it that starts, but never ends? I can’t imagine one.

Instead I drift round to the idea that maybe we need to die, just like we need to be born. And that without that frame around it, life would become shapeless and meaningless. And we would go mad. And that a long life is no better than a short life than a long book is better than a short book, or than a big painting is better than a small one. And living fast and dying young is just as good as living slow and dying old.

The Yardbirds got mentioned in the comments a few days ago, and I got to watch a few videos of them playing their numbers. It reminded me that I’d not heard of their lead singer, Keith Relf, for quite a long time. I soon discovered that he died at the age of 31, not very long after the Yardbirds split up, electrocuted by an incorrectly earthed electric guitar. At first it seemed rather sad that he’d died so young. But maybe it wasn’t. Maybe he’d sung everything he was going to sing. Much like Jimi Hendrix had played everything he was ever going to play. And Bill Hicks (who I’ve also been watching) had got all the laughs he was ever going to get. And that was the right time to call it quits.

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46 Responses to They All Still Keep Dying Anyway

  1. GC says:

    Jimi Knew all about it…

    The Ballad of Jimi

    Words and music by Jimi Hendrix.
    Recorded: Dimensional Sound Studios, New York, 1965
    Producer: Ed Chalpin Guitar, Vocals: Jimi Hendrix

    LYRICS
    Me and my best friend travelled down life’s highway.
    We talked of how things should be,
    Of peace and love for you and me.
    Of a life without hate.
    Of a life filled with love.
    On that first day, he played my guitar.
    Somehow I knew, we travelled far,
    We travelled fine, his distant star.
    Many things he would try,
    For he knew soon he’d die.
    Oh, why did it happen?
    All the sadness, he is gone.
    But he left us something that time can’t erase.
    Now he’s loved by us all.
    Yes, he’s loved by us all.
    That is my story. It has no end.
    Now Jimi’s gone, he’s not alone.
    His memory still lives on.
    Like the fox that he named,
    Though they still gained less pain.
    Five years, this he said.
    He’s not gone, he’s just dead.

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      BB KING is still rockin em all over the place save a hospital stay this week……….

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      • smokervoter says:

        While we’re doing Hendrix lyrics…

        From “If a 6 was 9” by Jimi Hendrix:

        Don’t nobody know what I’m talkin’ about
        I’ve got my own life to live
        I’m the one that’s gonna die when it’s time for me to die
        So let me live my life the way I want to

        Yeah, sing on brother, play on drummer.

        And from the same song, and as a reflection on how I ended up feeling about the stinking counter-culture after 13 long years of residing in The Hippie Capital of the World, aka Santa Cruz, California.

        Now if uh, six uh, huh, turned out to be nine
        Oh I don’t mind, I don’t mind uh ( Well all right… )
        If all the hippies cut off all their hair
        Oh I don’t care, oh I don’t care.
        Dig.

        And finally, with a slight correction for present world circumstances:

        White collar conservative liberal flashin’ down the street
        Pointin’ their plastic finger at me, ha !
        They’re hopin’ soon my kind will drop and die but uh
        I’m gonna wave my freak flag fag* high, high !
        Oww !

        *In the British sense of the word, of course.

        • nisakiman says:

          On the subject of guitar greats, here’s a more recent one. There’s only one string on his guitar, but he makes it rock, nonetheless! Great stuff!

    • Rose says:

      Quite true, it rained properly for the first time in ages the other day and as I looked out of the window Rainy Day started playing in my head and made me smile.

      Rainy day, dream away, let the sun take a holiday

      Someone has stuck the two parts together on this, but beware, the video is rather spooky.

      Rainy Day Dream Away, Still Raining Still Dreaming

  2. harleyrider1978 says:

    The biggest Fraud created is likely LIFESTYLE EPIDEMIOLOGY…………………That’s what your talking about Frank or better yet the Linked to studies that have no validity in anything.

    The rise of a pseudo-scientific links lobby

    Every day there seems to be a new study making a link between food, chemicals or lifestyle and ill-health. None of them has any link with reality.

    spiked-onlinedotcom/newsite/article/13287#dotU6ibAzYo59A

    Then the Mummy Study destroyed so much of the Nazi’s generation of claims that led to the saturated fat theory being wiped out…………. Or smoking and heart disease claims

    Mummies’ clogged arteries take smoking, fatty foods, lethargy out of the mix

    By Tom Valeo, Times Correspondent

    Tuesday, April 23, 2013 4:30am
    http://www.tampabay.com/news/aging/lifetimes/mummies-clogged-arteries-take-smoking-fatty-foods-lethargy-out-of-the-mix/2114897

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Lifestyle factors of people with exceptional longevity.

      Einstein College recently studied folks who lived past age 95. The reluctantly reported result: “People who live to 95 or older are no more virtuous than the rest of us in terms of their diet, exercise routine or smoking and drinking habits.”

      Einstein College press release:

      http://www.einstein.yu.edu/hom… … 78&pt=news

      Did you notice in link above that they just state that the very old smoked about as much as did people who died younger, with no detail given, although detail is given regarding eating, boozing, exercise, and so on? Well, when it came to publishing the abstract with the National Institutes of Health, they ignore smoking results entirely! They do say that smoking was studied, but make no mention whatsoever that smoking was not shown to impair longevity: again, as with the press release, precise detail is given regarding other studied factors, but when it came to smoking — the holy taboo of all holy taboos — they simply couldn’t bear even to mention their own finding!

      Here it is: the official NIH abstract:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21812767

      • harleyrider1978 says:

        Eating fat is good for you: Doctors change their minds after 40 years

        “Other experts have added their voices to his controversial call to end 40 years of advice to cut saturated fat – which has been described as “the greatest medical error of our time”.
        They claim the guidance has left millions of people at risk of developing cardiovascular ­disease and “led to the over-medication of millions of people with statins”.

        The public could just as effectively protect themselves by eating “real” food such as butter, milk and cheese and adopting the Mediterranean diet.”
        http://www.express.co.uk/news/

        “According to DiNicolantonio, this advice is based on misleading data from the 1950s, when pioneering researcher Ancel Keys theorized that saturated fats caused heart disease.
        Keys had access to data on fat consumption and heart disease rates from 22 countries, but excluded data from 16 countries that did not fit his hypothesis, DiNicolantonio said.

        A subsequent analysis of all 22 countries’ data disproved Keys’s theory. Nevertheless, the notion that saturated fats cause heart disease has persisted, DiNicolantonio said.

        He cautioned that guidelines urging people to replace saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats do more harm than good.

        “We need a public health campaign as strong as the one we had in the seventies and eighties demonizing saturated fats, to say that we got it wrong,” he said in a related podcast.”
        http://www.theglobeandmail.com

        That reminds me.

        “The modern salt saga started in 1904 with a paper by Ambard and Brochard who showed an association between salt intake and blood pressure in six patients. On the basis of these observations they created a salt–blood pressure hypothesis.

        Subsequently in 1907 the results were opposed by Lôwenstein,and from then on the salt–blood pressure hypothesis has been the basis for a dispute between supporters of the hypothesis and sceptics.

        What we can learn from this is that the salt–blood pressure hypothesis and the controversy dates back to the first decade of the previous century, initially based on a few case histories”
        “In the following years Allan’s positive results were both confirmed and disproved by several authors, but during the late 1930s the use of salt restriction faded.”

        “In the introduction of his 1960 paper Dahl defines his position, namely that salt is deleterious. Salt is compared with fall-out, carcinogens and atherogenic factors, and later in the paper with tobacco, alcohol, and fat”
        http: //ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/con…

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          According to DiNicolantonio, this advice is based on misleading data from the 1950s

          When did the heavy hitter anti smokers start calling old age diseases tobacco related………..1950s and then in the 60s………

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          It appears it all started about the time Jonas Salk shut down his Polio research lab. I believe that’s the last time they actually tried to prove end points using what most of would call real hard science,instead of lifestyle questionaires to beat a dead horse even more for political agendas using health facism as its main tool of destruction.

  3. “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Here’s Tom with the weather.” Bill Hicks 1961-1994

    One of my favourite quotes of all time!

    Enjoyed your post today. Some of those who committed the crime of living fast and dying young, lived fast and died WISE, which is more than can be said for the tight, terrified, mean, righteous antis.

    I do think we eat wrongly. That is the fault of the tight, terrified, mean, righteous antis spreading imaginary ideas on salt and fat and telling us to eat carbohydrates in the form of breads, cereals etc and five fruits and veg a day. The “healthy plate” guide used in the UK is a laugh. Our health leaders are really clueless. Personally, I eat high fat, high protein, ignore the salt, no carbohydrates, no sugar and no commercial foods. I do that, because I discovered eating this way, makes me feel good and keeps my arthritis and diabetes under control without profit to Big Pharma.

    When I watch how our leaders behave on every front, I am convinced none of them know what they are doing. Currently Bill Hick’s idea of “the imagination of themselves” contains very little wisdom and a lot of pompous ignorant/regurgitated prattle.

    Enjoy your blog!

  4. waltc says:

    When I was 19, I watched from the “death seat” as the car went into an out of control quadruple 360 spin on a stormy nite on the George Washington Bridge. I remember seeing the railing coming at me from quick wild angles as though reality had vertigo and was certain I was riding death’s merry-go-round. At 24, in a tin can plane in the middle of the night, we got violently buffeted by a rollicking storm and nearly clobbered by wind sheer. I said to the pilot when we (emergency) landed, Was that as bad as I thought it was? and, he, pale and sweaty, said, I didn’t think we’d make it. No, I would not like to have died that young and missed all the really good things I’d’ve missed. Or even some of the bad things. But I’ll think it’s time to die when I’m bored and boring, or physically debilitated, or existentially disgusted at which time death may seem like a kind of blessed release. Until then, I enjoy the pleasures of consciousness. But otoh the prospect of eternal life or even eternal consciousness would seem like…well, like the cruel punishment of a life sentence.

  5. smokervoter says:

    The house specialty of my first rock band band was Yardbirds tunes. You name it, we played it. And what a lifetime fringe benefit I got out of it. I, in effect, remotely studied under the grand tutelage of master Jeff Beck.

    To this day I play a lot like him. My older brother emails me music files (he’s a real life musician who’s written over 250 songs) and I throw lead guitar accompaniments in using the Audacity computer program and email them back to him. He always says ‘give some of your finest Beckish stuff there, kid’.
    —————

    Keith Relf’s death still bothers me, he was such a great talent. He had an uncanny natural treble quality (as opposed to bassy) to his voice.

    If my memory serves me well, he was standing barefooted on an elevated fireplace masonry step. There was an iron gas pipe that fueled the “fake flame” to the fireplace under the bricks. The amp wasn’t grounded correctly and, as we all know, metal is an excellent conductor and WHAM, just like that he was gone.

    I got zapped royally right on the nose from my microphone during a gig one time. There was a big, huge bluish spark and my heart felt like it stopped. There used to be a ground switch on amplifiers that didn’t have any ON or OFF (or anything) markings. You either switched it right or left. After that I always had my sound/equipment man make damn sure everything was 100% kosher before I touched anything.

  6. Rose says:

    Instead I drift round to the idea that maybe we need to die, just like we need to be born

    Yes, when we have had our time in the sun, we need to make room for the new ones, it’s a continuous process and desperately trying to hang on past our due date snarls up the wheels.

    Now, when the old are made to work years longer while the young have no work to do, the natural sequence of things is being turned on it’s head.

  7. But they all still keep dying anyway. Maybe I’d feel differently about it if lots of these diet and fitness freaks actually did live a lot longer than smokers and drinkers like me. Like if they were typically living to the age of 150, while jerks like me only made it to 70. But I’ve never heard of anyone making 150.

    Are people really living longer due to recent medical advances or changes to their ‘lifestyle’? Several months ago I left a comment about the ripe old ages of the actors that were in the 1942 Hitchcock film, “Saboteur” which I had recently watched (I watch old films and usually check them out on IMDb.com afterwards). Just checked and Norman Lloyd who played the Saboteur will be 100 if he lives for another 31 days.

    I’m sure there’s a piece of scripture which says that man is appointed to live no longer than 120, but certainly our lifespan is predetermined, short of perhaps suicide or murder (or sheer stupidity?). For one thing, our genes make sure of that.

    I think that what made people live a bit longer in the past century or two was more due to better sanitation and higher standards of living than to doctors and Big Pharma.

    As for Alzheimer’s, I heard recently that a few decades ago 1% of over-85s got it whereas today it’s more like 50%. Don’t know if that’s true or not.

    • Rose says:

      Apart from sanitation, I put it down to the Clean Air Acts, anyone who can remember the 50’s and 60’s or before, knows the huge burden of air pollution that was slowly lifted , fabricated concerns about second hand smoke makes a mockery of what people really had to endure before.
      The shocking thing is, never having known anything different, everyone thought that houses covered in soot and industrial smogs were perfectly normal, because they were.

      As a child, I had no idea what the natural colour of the local stone was, it took years of rain and the fashion for sand-blasting to finally reveal it.

      • nisakiman says:

        I don’t think people are living particularly longer (in terms of being fit and active into old age as opposed to being kept alive in a state of limbo) these days so much as the fact that infant mortality has reduced considerably, which of course has a huge impact on average lifespans. Also, we haven’t had a major war for a couple of generations, which will also make a noticeable difference to average lifespans over the past hundred years.

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          The US just upped the average lifetime to 78.8 years. But remember they don’t use any junk in it. They just are supposedly using only official death stats at age then figure……….doesn’t matter if your fat a smoker or a health freak…………..

        • Good points nisakiman.

        • Comments out of sync. Press on regardless… Imagine, Harley, if they factored in abortions to work out the average lifespan…

      • It was the same in Glasgow until the 70s when they started sandblasting the buildings. The complete change of colour didn’t look right as a young boy. There are so many tenement blocks in the city the process took about 20 years. Glasgow Council used to be Europe’s biggest landlord. Don’t know if it still is after the ‘right to buy’. Obviously the buildings didn’t get so dirty due to people walking past them smoking!

  8. smokervoter says:

    Like I said the other day, the Yardbirds were definitely outside-the-box. You want waay outside box, I got yer’ box right here.

    Hot House of Omagarashid.

    The whole raison d’être of this song was to showcase the last one minute with Jeff Beck’s extraordinary playing and tone. You have no idea how revolutionary the riffage from 1:40 to end was at the time. It was pre-Hendrix, pre-Cream, pre-Led Zepplin, pre-EVERYTHING.

    It’s still revolutionary and too hot to touch. It’s quintessential Beck. He still incorporates elements of this solo into a lot of his new stuff.

    PS: For you very impatient types, skip to 1:00. But fer christsakes the whole song is only 2:42 long. It’s not like you’re gonna’ die tomorrow or anything…

  9. beobrigitte says:

    I was thinking today that, in the first half of the last century, vaccines and treatments were found for a great many infectious diseases, and the result was that people started living quite a lot longer. Rising living standards helped that too.

    And even NOW we do have an increasingly ageing population, many of which require full time care and find themselves deprived of the things that used to make them an individual. They are herded into pens that are called ‘Heaven’s door’; fed and watered at set times, put to bed at set times and vulnerable to ill treatment.
    We also have an increasing young, mentally ill diagnosed, population. They are those who are supposed to fund via taxes those who live so much longer, instead they, too, become a ‘money drain’ and the generation preparing for retirement finds itself back on the work market.

    We are constantly told that we NEED to aim for LIVING LONGER and be HEALTHY – and sign up for a designed non-invasive-procedure-lobotomy also called healthist’s way of living.
    People do live longer nowadays; and todays centenarians have lived through 2 wars and many, many years of encountering smoking/being smokers. Funnily enough, this is never mentioned anywhere.

    Seriously, who wants to live to 100 in today’s society?

  10. prog says:

    As Chris Snowdon (more eloquently) pointed out a couple of years ago…

    Communicable diseases have been more or less been eradicated in the West, thus deaths caused by NCD have increased as people live longer. But the freaks are claiming that these are largely self inflicted and could be avoided by changes in lifestyle. Yet most are age-related

    So what the hell are we expected to die from?

    • Rose says:

      With the benefits of hindsight, these seem particularly sad.

      WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2013
      Liberia
      http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/policy/country_profile/lbr.pdf

      Liberia Enforces Public Smoking Ban
      September 26, 2011 8:00 PM

      “Liberia has begun implementing legislation passed in 2008 that prohibits smoking in buses, restaurants, workplaces, and other public places.”
      http: //www.voanews.com/content/liberia-enforcing-public-smoking-ban-130638658/158908.html

      In Sierra Leone, Health Minister Bans Smoking
      2009
      “The campaign was launched on Tuesday 22nd December 2009 by the Health and Sanitation Ministry, in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO).”
      http: //news.sl/drwebsite/exec/view.cgi?archive=1&num=14037

      Smoke-free spaces in Africa growing at a snail’s pace
      05 October 2011
      “As these countries struggle to create smoke-free spaces, and respect for smoking bans, they should not neglect the opportunity to advance tobacco control by putting in place warning labels on cigarette packages, which “are overwhelmingly supported by the public”, according to the 2011 WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic. The report highlighted that such labels can be implemented at virtually no cost to government.

      “The alert is red – we must force governments to recognise that exposure to tobacco smoke causes death, diseases and disability.”
      http://www.fctc.org/fca-news/opinion-pieces/600-smoke-free-spaces-in-africa-growing-at-a-snails-pace

      • Some French bloke says:

        The report highlighted that such labels can be implemented at virtually no cost to government.

        This is true only if applied to the short-term cost, for “… the people reserve the right to demand explanation, accountability, justification and justice anytime, particularly when the people wake up from their induced lethargy” (Oladipo G. B. Ogunseitan, Be Afra, Volume 1)

        When enough people wake up and the whole insane edifice collapses, there’ll be hell to pay for tens of goverments for having misinformed people on such a massive scale. The domino effect will be a sight for sore eyes.

      • beobrigitte says:

        Rose, indeed these are very sad. Very, very sad.

        “As these countries struggle to create smoke-free spaces, and respect for smoking bans, they should not neglect the opportunity to advance tobacco control by putting in place warning labels on cigarette packages, which “are overwhelmingly supported by the public”, according to the 2011 WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic.

        These countries “struggle to create smoke-free spaces, and respect for smoking bans”
        but the sentence ends with: ” to advance tobacco control by putting in place warning labels on cigarette packages, which “are overwhelmingly supported by the public.”

        Now would be a good time to ‘advance’ tobacco control in e.g. Liberia?
        “The alert is red – we must force governments to recognise that exposure to tobacco smoke causes death, diseases and disability.”
        Surely the African governments – and especially the population – eagerly await:
        WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2014
        Liberia

        (Apologies – I could not resist this; the thought that the WHO could not really be bothered with the Ebola outbreak because there is a ‘deadly tobacco epidemic’ to deal with first makes me sick.)

  11. Bernd Palmer says:

    “… when compared with the mayhem we can expect for our children and grandchildren if the world does nothing”
    What do we know about the future for our children and grandchildren? How can we protect them from war, accidents, acts of terrorism, meteorite strikes, natural catastrophes, unemployment, riots, diseases (like cancer or even Ebola)?
    Did our ancestors make any effort to protect us from all these risks? I guess they had more important things to do, like struggling for their own life.

  12. Some French bloke says:

    Food for thought for those pondering the link between cancer and ageing, in the form of variations in the risk of dying of cancer for women in the Netherlands between 1969 and 2011, using crude rates for 100,000 (all ages).

    Cancer site 1969 2011 Variation (per cent)

    All sites………………………169.8….236.6….+ 39.3
    Lung……………………………..4.6……47.1….+ 924
    Lip, oral cavity, pharynx,
    larynx and oesophagus……2.9…….8.3….+ 186
    Pancreas ………………………7.0…..15.8….+ 126
    Colon, rectum and anus….16.8…..29.8….+ 77.4
    (Colon………………………….17.9…..23.8….+ 33
    Intestine……………………….25.5…..30.6….+ 20
    Breast………………………….35.0…..38.8….+ 10.9
    Ovary: 12.4 (1979), 12.4 (2011), no variation.
    Uterus………………………….13.5……8.0….- 40.7
    Stomach………………………19.0……6.6….- 65.3

    In 1969, men in the Netherlands had a LC crude rate of 73.5/100,000, that’s 15.87 times higher than women’s (IOW, women had a 93.72% lower risk).
    In 2011, after the peak rates of the 1980s (100 to 105/100,000), Dutch men had a LC rate of 79.6, only 68.8% higher than women’s (IOW, the gap has been reduced 23 times).

  13. garyk30 says:

    Wellll, ‘Death’ is rather rare. Altho, of course all will die, mostly in their old age.
    USA data:
    People dying per year are only 1 per 131, on average.

    That is 0.74%. (3/4ths of 1 percent)

    The rate varies greatly, as one might guess, by age.

    Over 65 the rate is 1 per 21 people. (about 5%)

    Under 65 the rate is 1 per 573 or 17/100ths of 1%.

    Lifestyle changes by the young are not going to make much difference in those basic facts.

  14. garyk30 says:

    A neat paradox about smokers vs never-smokers and the diseases ’caused’ by smoking is this:

    Altho TC harp about smokers being more apt to die from those diseases due to a higher rate of death, smokers have the same chance of NOT DYING from them.

    Heavy smokers and never-smokers have almost precisely the same chances of NOT dying from those diseases caused by smoking.
    Doll’s doctor mortality report.

    http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/400720/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/bmj.38142.554479.AE

    The table on page 3 shows this:
    Lung cancer deaths per year.
    heavy smokers(25+/day) = 4.17/1,000 = 995.83 did not die.

    never-smokers = 0.17/1,000 = 999.83 did not die.

    999.83 divided by 995.83 = 1.004.

    Never-smokers are only 1.004 times more likely than heavy smokers, to not die from lung cancer!!!

    When you have to go to 3 decimal places to find a difference, that difference is, for all practicality, non-existent.

    Other results:
    mouth/throat cancers = 1.001 times more likely to not die.

    all other cancers = 1.002 times.

    COPD = 1.002 times.

    other respiratory = 1.002 times.

    heart attack = 1.005 times.

    stroke = 1.002 times.

    other vascular = 1.003 times.

    I do not know; but I suspect, those figures will be about the same for all of the bad things like booze, obesity, and etc.

    Why do we let the Nannies claim that lifestyle changes about those things can keep us from dying from them when our chances of not dying are the same to start with?

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Lifestyle factors of people with exceptional longevity.

      Einstein College recently studied folks who lived past age 95. The reluctantly reported result: “People who live to 95 or older are no more virtuous than the rest of us in terms of their diet, exercise routine or smoking and drinking habits.”

      Einstein College press release:

      http://www.einstein.yu.edu/hom… … 78&pt=news

      Did you notice in link above that they just state that the very old smoked about as much as did people who died younger, with no detail given, although detail is given regarding eating, boozing, exercise, and so on? Well, when it came to publishing the abstract with the National Institutes of Health, they ignore smoking results entirely! They do say that smoking was studied, but make no mention whatsoever that smoking was not shown to impair longevity: again, as with the press release, precise detail is given regarding other studied factors, but when it came to smoking — the holy taboo of all holy taboos — they simply couldn’t bear even to mention their own finding!

      Here it is: the official NIH abstract:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21812767

  15. harleyrider1978 says:

    What we should be doing is telling these libtard/progressive judges and lawmakers to get the hell out of the family life,leave parents alone and dismantle the biggest government control system of the public ever created since slavery!

  16. harleyrider1978 says:

    Frank your gonna love this one

    Observations
    Public Health
    http://www.bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g6006
    Social media attacks on public health advocates
    BMJ 2014; 349 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g6006 (Published 08 October 2014)
    Cite this as: BMJ 2014;349:g6006

    How big corporations are helping to fund the internet trolls

    For those who advocate for healthy public policies, social media are both a blessing and a curse. They offer a means of communicating instantly to large audiences. Yet they also offer the opportunity for those seeking to undermine public health to undermine you. Your words are taken out of context and twisted. You are insulted and abused on Twitter. Most of us soon realise that this is the price to be paid for taking a stand and refuse to engage with our attackers, whose main aim seems to be to provoke a hostile response that they can ruthlessly exploit. We rapidly become adept at using Twitter’s “block” function.

    But who is behind these attacks? It is not always easy to know, as many shelter behind the anonymity afforded by the web. Some are clearly extreme libertarians, opposed to any role for the state and, especially, anything that gets in the way of the right of informed adults to engage …

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      If anybody has access to the whole bloody bullshit piece Id love for them to post it here to be read by all of us………..

    • Frank Davis says:

      Pity they don’t let you read the whole thing.

    • beobrigitte says:

      Oh dear. The old ‘little David nanny’ vs ‘big bad corporation-funded Goliath’ has long had it’s time.
      I am surprised that the BMJ editorial team deems such a poor article good enough to publish.
      Perhaps the media’s broadcasting of the ‘wonderpill’ soon available on the NHS for moderate drinkers wasn’t much of a success and the response was a little too ‘unexpected’?
      Perhaps the October-thingy is not progressing nicely, either, and there is an urge to be THE, albeit by now much practiced and therefore professional, victim yet again?
      Perhaps people just simply have had enough and begin to worry about things that might be worth worrying about?

      Since you have to subscribe to read the article, perhaps the BMJ also lost a lot of readers?

      Whatever, an article about the progress of e.g. Ebola vaccine(s) would be something more appropriate for the BMJ to publish, wouldn’t it?

      Perhaps the BMJ really does arrive in sealed plastic and is placed, still sealed in plastic, in the archive from which, amongst many things, also toilet paper is produced!

  17. As for Jimi dying young, Doug Stanhope nailed it:

  18. Lyrics of the times says it all.
    The Who 1960’s…Hope I die before I get old
    Robbie Williams 1990’s…I hope I’m old before I die

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