Monthly Archives: October 2010

20 marlboro please.

In his Open Letter to Vince Cable in the New Statesman, Peter Kellner makes a number of claims which defy common sense. He says the tobacco display ban won’t hurt small retailers, when it quite obviously will, and the retailers have … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 63 Comments

Two Wings of One Army

‘We are,’ he said, ‘subject to a heavily biased and carefully organized propaganda.’ ‘The current debate is a public policy debate with enormous implications… It is about the government, the politicians, their scribes and the lobbyists who want to get … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 42 Comments

Smoky Drinky Thoughts

While I’ve been tinkering around with statistics and scatter diagrams and so forth, I’ve been thinking about something Leg-iron wrote a few days back: I have seen the future and it’s smoky-drinky. He said: I like pubs. I really like to spend … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 45 Comments

More Smoking Stats

Yesterday I dug up some data on the prevalence of smoking in countries around the world on Tradingeconomics, and data on lung cancer incidence in countries around the world at Globocan. I used these to put together a table of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 108 Comments

Smoking and Lung Cancer Stats

I got interested in the geographical prevalence of smoking, lung cancer, and rainfall. I found that tradingeconomics had figures for the percentage prevalence of smoking among men and women for most countries in the world. And I also found a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | 66 Comments

The Fallout Hypothesis 3

I’ve been reading Killing Our Own: The Disaster of America’s Experience with Atomic Radiation by Harvey Wasserman & Norman Solomon, published in 1982. Chapter 4 describes the US atmospheric testing in the 1950s. The dangers to the public of these … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 47 Comments

The Fallout Hypothesis 2

A few months back, in The Fallout Hypothesis, I explored the idea that many cancers, including lung cancer, were caused by radioactive fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests between 1945 and 1963. Fredrik Eich became interested in the idea, with … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 39 Comments