Staying Home

It snowed last night here in Herefordshire. I haven’t been out to see how deep it is, but from a distance it looks like it’s 3 or 4 inches deep.

That’s 3 or 4 inches too much in England. It’s more or less a natural disaster. Heathrow airport closed down. And David Cameron cancelled his long-heralded EU speech. Probably because he knew he’d never get to Holland or Belgium or wherever he was supposed to be making the speech. He probably wouldn’t even have managed to get out of the front door of 10, Downing Street through 4 inches of snow. After all, I didn’t manage it today either.

I didn’t go out because, forewarned of the impending disaster, I went out yesterday to buy the basic essentials for survival. i.e. Scotch whisky. And sugar. And chocolate. And prawn toast. I hadn’t tried prawn toast before, so I thought I’d give them a try. And then I ate them as soon as I got home. So my survival pack is low on prawn toast. In fact, it’s completely prawn-toast-free.

I sympathised with Leg-iron, however, that his central heating has just stopped working. Mid-January is the perfect time for that to happen in Scotland – which is, I believe, about 10 degrees colder than England at all times of year.

I don’t even know whether my central heating works. Or how to turn it on, for that matter. So I may, unbeknownst to myself, actually have the same problem as Leggy. I’ve also got an electric heater that the previous occupant left behind, but I’ve never turned that on either. And I have an electric oil immersion heater. It’s got lots of mysterious buttons and dials on it. It’s also got wheels. I understand wheels. And that was probably why I bought it. “Hey look! An oil immersion heater with wheels. Cool! I wonder how many miles to the gallon it does?”

The result is that for the entire time I’ve been living in my little flat, I’ve never turned any heating on. Part of the reason is that it’s got cavity wall insulation and double glazing. Though my habit of keeping a couple of windows permanently open defeats that energy-saving measure. But then, it’s also sandwiched between other flats where they do keep the heating on. So I’m probably being kept warm by the old ladies next door, who keep their heating on all through summer as well.

Not that my flat is exactly toasty warm as a result. Room temperature right now is 11 degrees C ( 52 degrees F). That’s about 10 degrees lower than is usually recommended for thermal comfort. But since my easylife fur lined Nordic slippers arrived yesterday, just in the nick of time, and I’ve also unearthed the cable-knit pullover in the bottom drawer, I’m more or less fully kitted out. Just need to get me some cable-knit trousers now. Or Nordic trousers. Or Nordic cable-knit trousers.

How do you endure such temperatures, Frank? I hear you ask. Particularly with no trousers.

Simple answer: Sheer grit and determination.

And a touch of English stiff upper lip. (Does anyone actually know what a stiff upper lip is? Or what they look like? I think that if I woke up one day with a stiff upper lip, I’d suspect it had frozen in the night. In fact, at 11 degrees C, you get a mild case of stiff upper lip. Nothing to worry about though.)

And not knowing how to switch anything on.

But I tell a lie. Because I did finally give in a month or two back, when room temperature had dropped to 8- 9 degrees C. And I switched on the oil immersion heater. Which was one hell of a job to do, given all the incomprehensible dials and switches on it. It was like trying to start a Spitfire. Which was perhaps that’s why it’s got wheels. They’re the undercarriage.

I have a terror of turning things on. Particularly something that hasn’t been turned on for two or three years. They always start making strange and alarming noises. And they very often give of a strong odour too, as the dead mouse inside them starts to fry. I sort of expect them to explode. It’s only after they’ve been working for an hour or two, doing whatever they do, that my alarm subsides.

Anyway, after gingerly trying all the switches on it, eventually a little red warning alarm light turned on, and what sounded like the Merlin engine started clattering into life. I stood well back to avoid the propeller. And pressed no more buttons: I didn’t want to fire a couple of hundred cannon shells through the wall into the old lady next door. After all, she’s been helping me keep warm.

But some things in my flat turn themselves on of their own accord. They seem to have a life of their own. Like my gas-fired water heater. I think it’s supposed to only turn on when I turn on the hot tap. But it quite often fires itself up of its own free will. I think it just decides that it’s bored, and feels like, say, …heating some water. So it turns itself on, and then a few seconds later it says, ‘Nah! Can’t be bothered,’ and turns itself off again. It also has a panel of switches on the bottom, naturally. And, no, I don’t know what they do either. It’s probably been left in Periodic Autostart Mode or something by the previous owner. And you can only reset it to factory settings if you hold down the red button while pressing the + button three times.

Anyway I’m going to be staying home for the next few days. I stay home a lot anyway. Which is probably why I haven’t caught the Norovirus bug that’s sweeping Britain. I saw some advice somewhere about how to avoid getting it. Going to hospitals or doctors’ surgeries was one pretty sure-fire way of getting it.  I think that pubs and cafes and restaurants were pretty lethal too.

But I’m a smoker and I hardly ever go to any of those places if I can help it. And when the plague is over, and they go round knocking on people’s doors to find out who’s still alive, they’ll probably find that the sole survivors are all smokers. That’ll teach ‘em.

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52 Responses to Staying Home

  1. junican says:

    Have you thought about the possibility that you might be dead? If your body temperature is cold, then you will not feel the cold. Also, you will not go out. Also, you will not know what the dials on the machines are for.
    Pretty obvious really.

  2. Hmmm… Junican may have something there Frank! You should investigate it!

    I remember going to the doctor about fifteen years ago because I had no pulse. Heh, really freaked out the nurse who came in to weigh me and take my blood pressure. She went tearing out of the examining room and the doc showed up in less than a minute rather than the usual ten minute wait. :>

    He asked what kind of joke I was trying to pull, so I just held out my arm and asked HIM to take my blood pressure.

    Soon thereafter I was lying on a gurney looking up at a TV screen where I could see the results of a bicycle accident a month or so earlier: an internally ripped right subclavian artery with a clog that was bouncing around up above my shoulder and threatening to head up to my brain with every heartbeat. :> Heh, I looked at the doc and said, “hmm… that don’t look so good, does it?”

    Seven hours later, I’m happily recovering in the ICU and being VERY grateful to the surgeon who was called in from a formal luncheon for an emergency operation. Soooo…. I’m pretty sure *I’M* not dead at the moment, particularly since I prefer SEVENTY two degrees Fahrenheit in my house!!

    Sheeesh, you Brits ‘n Scots ‘n Welshens are nuts. How do you survive in those temps inside your houses? If I lived over there… well… I’d probably have NO PULSE again!

    :>
    Michael

  3. harleyrider1978 says:

    Well Its 33 f here Ive got a blanket on and a space heater at my feet. I catch cold easily since I had Lyme disease and catch everything that comes around. I like it about 78 in the winter and about 68-72 in the summer heat. Ive really got 2 times a year I get out fall and spring. I once walked from my brother inlaws house in uniontown Pa back in 1997 to my father in laws house. It was -5 f at the time. It was a simple 1 block walk in the frozen snow and ice. When I got to the house My body temp had dropped 4 degrees and I was shaking with chills for 8 hours and soaking in a tub of hot water the whole time. Its the core temperature that hard to get back up.
    I survived it but since then if I pushed to hard,stay up to late and get cold outside or even to hot Im down for days and nites recovering.

    Frank the Norovirus ive had countless times and it can last months on me. Its not something you develop an immunity to. S o the doc told me the multiple times Ive had it besides other crud. But my immune system is fried from the tick and multiple stays in hospitals getting intravenous anti-biotics thru the years. I just wonder what I could have really achieved if not for a sickness that leaves you pretty well always sick. You hold your chin up and your natural pain level increases so you can still go forward. I kinda like to think I coulda been a lawyer or a doctor maybe. Instead I got fucked with over smoking,the only thing thats really enjoyable to me in my life.. I had my friends at the waffle House to hang with and get the latest bull going on… Life long friendships destroyed with the stroke of a pen 1 october 2007 in Tenn.

    That began my new life,fighting back destroying the ones who wanted to destroy me and my life!

    I guess by now they know they fucked with the wrong smoker ehh!

    • Rose says:

      Crumbs Harley, you have been in the wars, I hear that Lyme Disease is really bad. My daughter’s friend’s mother has it, I know she get’s really ill..

    • Frank Davis says:

      and a space heater at my feet.

      I find that if I manage to keep my feet warm, the rest of me will stay warm too. So if my feet start turning into numb blocks of ice, I warm them up – very often with a hot water bottle under them.

      • Rose says:

        My feet are permanently frozen, but then I do wander about the house in my stockinged feet.
        I’m just not keen on slippers for some reason.

        • prog says:

          My daughter bought me some Homer Simpson slippers (twice, the first pair wore out). They are absolutely brilliant – sometimes the rest of my body might be in the early stages of hypothermia but my feet are always as warm as toast.

        • beobrigitte says:

          My daughter bought me some Homer Simpson slippers (twice, the first pair wore out). They are absolutely brilliant – sometimes the rest of my body might be in the early stages of hypothermia but my feet are always as warm as toast.

          Prog, do the Homer Simpson slippers come with a “6-er Blech” (6-pack sheet metal) Duff Beer?
          Apparently Duff Beer is (was last year) available in Britain
          http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2104242/Homer-Simpson-favourite-Duff-beer-sale-Britain.html
          the lowest rated comment underneath the article lamented the “poor chiiiiildren”.
          The worried minds…………

      • beobrigitte says:

        Rose and Frank: that your feet are permanently cold could be low blood pressure. I’ve always had cold feet; as a 9 year old I was sent for 6 weeks to a clinic thing near Lake Lugano as my blood pressure was at best 65/40 and I suffered head-ache attacks before which my field of vision was reduced. I was hell bend after a week to be punished by being sent back home – for some obscure reason they put up with me the full 6 weeks. I must say I actually enjoyed my stay after being called to an office, initially to be told off the umpteenth time, but in the end I lost it and told them that this “under 10 group” was plain boring; there was nothing interesting to read and less even to do! The 12 – 15 group was much more interesting!!!!

        After all this rambling on; my headaches were due to migraenes and the low blood pressure never bothered me, other than permanently cold feet. I got used to both.

        • Rose says:

          I have Reynaud’s Phenomenon, It troubled me a lot as a child in winter, but it has bothered me less and less as I have got older. I do admit that not wearing slippers is sheer folly, but I don’t count my toes and fingers as truly cold until they go white.

          Gel improves circulation disorder – 1999
          “The key to the treatment is nitric oxide, which is known as a very effective vasodilator (an agent which widens blood vessels)”.
          http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/516365.stm

        • Frank Davis says:

          I don’t have permanently cold feet. They just get cold on cold days. Same with my fingers.

        • Dear Franky,

          I find that if I stick my head in the freezer and then close the door firmly that after a while my head starts to feel cold.

          Should I see a doctor?

          :?
          MJM

        • Rose says:

          MJM

          I know it takes all sorts but I think if you regularly shut your head in a freezer then a psychiatrist might be more in order.

        • Rose, I had a psychiatrist, but some mean men in white coats came and took him away. He sent me some socks that he’s knitted though. They have little yellow ducklings on them and keep my feet warm. I’ve written him asking him to knit me a warm hat.

          – MJM

        • Rose says:

          Good idea MJM
          Knitting is excellent therapy, I do it frequently myself.

  4. harleyrider1978 says:

    Number of Bribes Paid in the European Union

    in Europe, Financial Crime

    Transparency International reported that around 20 million bribes are paid out to officials throughout the European Union.

    8.1 million bribes were paid out in the medical services industry.

    The European Commission estimates that the costs of corruption within the EU is around $159 Billion (€120 Billion), or 1 percent of the EU’s GDP.

    (Bribes paid around the world.)

    Source: Andy Carlin, “EU corruption amounts to €120 billion in bribes a year,” New Europe, January 16, 2013.
    http://www.havocscope.com/number-of-bribes-paid-in-the-european-union/

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      Afghanistan: $1 Billion Paid Out
      Afghanistan – Police: $100,000 to be Police Chief
      Bangladesh: $86 per Household Each Year
      China: $10,000 to Education Officials
      Czech Republic: Average Bribe between $248 to $497
      Greece: $2,500 Paid to Public Officials
      Illegal Loggers: $25,000 to $50,000 for Permits
      Ivory Coast: $300 Million Paid Out at Checkpoints
      Kenya: Average Kenyan Pays 16 Bribes per Month
      Mexico: $1.2 Billion To Municipal Police Per Year
      Mexico – Police: 65% of Bribes Paid Less than $6,000
      Nigeria: $3.2 Billion Accepted by Civil Servants and Government Workers
      Pakistan: $1,200 to Police Chiefs by Alcohol Smugglers
      Romania: $1 Million Paid Out Each Day
      Romania – Medical Services: $6,500 for Brain Surgery
      Russia – Average Citizen: $189 Paid by Average Citizens
      Russia – Business: $10,000 for Business Matters
      Russia – Education: $1 Billion Paid Out for Admission
      South Africa: Traffic Police Ask for Most Bribes
      Thailand: $3.3 Billion in Economic Losses
      United States: $15,000 to Border Patrol Agent
      Vietnam: Drug Prices 40 – 60% Higher due to Bribes Paid to Doctor

  5. harleyrider1978 says:

    Tax Revenue Losses from Cigarette Smuggling in the United States

    in Americas, Financial Crime

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives estimates that the federal, state and local governments lose a combined total of nearly $10 Billion a year in tax revenue due to the smuggling of cigarettes across state lines.

    In the State of Virginia, that tax on a pack of cigarettes is $0.30. In the State of New York, the tax rate is $4.35.

    Smuggled cigarettes makes up to 40 percent of the entire cigarette market is made up of cigarettes smuggled in from other locations.

    A smuggler can fill up a car with 600 cases of cigarettes, and can fit 12,000 cases into a large van.

    Source: “Cigarette-smuggling: The urge to smurf,” Economist, November 24, 2012.
    http://www.havocscope.com/tag/cigarette-smuggling/

    • roobeedoo2 says:

      I wonder how much tax revenue governments are losing through people giving up because of the bans, tax hikes and anti-smoking propaganda. Is there a correlation between the escalating implementation of anti-smoker initiatives globally and the financial difficulties the world now faces? Was it the straw that broke the camel’s back?

      • Rose says:

        I wouldn’t be at all surprised.
        We are known to be a gregarious lot, so social isolation was an obvious route to try to bend us to their will. The problem is that we are also creative, resourceful, quick thinking and anything but meek and compliant.
        Cutting us out from the herd has only resulted in financial loss and the harder they push, the more that everyone seems to be digging in their heels.

        • roobeedoo2 says:

          I wonder if anybody has researched this or not. If not, could it a project for some die hard smokers to embark on? ‘Anti-smoking kills society’ could be a powerful meme to wield.

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          World Atlas: More People Smoking Cigarettes than Ever

          Top Stories 1 of 3

          World Atlas: More People Smoking Cigarettes than Ever

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          By Fiona Keating | January 6, 2013 1:30 PM GMT
          By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world.
          By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world

          There are more people smoking now than ever before, despite health warnings and the rising price of cigarettes. In 1980, 4,453 billion cigarettes went up in smoke, which increased to 6,319 billion in 2010. By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world.

          Top of the charts in terms of nicotine addiction are Asia and Australia, which is where 57 percent of cigarettes are smoked today.

          These alarming statistics are among many of the intriguing facts laid bare in the ninth edition of Dan Smith’s The State of the World Atlas.

          Elsewhere, the book reports that 19 percent of Americans say they could not feed their families in 2011, despite living in one of the world’s richest countries. Meanwhile, 20 percent of India’s population remains undernourished, despite its Gross National Income rising by 450 percent since 1990.

          An even more shocking revelation is that 2.5 billion people live on less than £1.25 a day, which represents one in three of the global population.

          Top Stories 1 of 3

          World Atlas: More People Smoking Cigarettes than Ever

          Article

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          By Fiona Keating | January 6, 2013 1:30 PM GMT
          By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world.
          By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world

          There are more people smoking now than ever before, despite health warnings and the rising price of cigarettes. In 1980, 4,453 billion cigarettes went up in smoke, which increased to 6,319 billion in 2010. By 2020, you can expect to find nearly seven billion cigarette ends littering the world.

          Top of the charts in terms of nicotine addiction are Asia and Australia, which is where 57 percent of cigarettes are smoked today.

          These alarming statistics are among many of the intriguing facts laid bare in the ninth edition of Dan Smith’s The State of the World Atlas.

          Elsewhere, the book reports that 19 percent of Americans say they could not feed their families in 2011, despite living in one of the world’s richest countries. Meanwhile, 20 percent of India’s population remains undernourished, despite its Gross National Income rising by 450 percent since 1990.

          An even more shocking revelation is that 2.5 billion people live on less than £1.25 a day, which represents one in three of the global population.

        • Rose says:

          “There are more people smoking now than ever before, despite health warnings and the rising price of cigarettes.”

          I suppose that as with precious stones and other rare or valuable things, people instinctively feel that the higher the price, the more desirable the commodity, especially as those in Authority are having such a fit about it.

      • jaxthefirst says:

        Roo,

        Absolutely. General economic decline follows in the wake of comprehensive smoking bans as surely as night follows day.

        It really doesn’t take a genius to work out why. If you make even something not-primarily smoking-related, like a day’s shopping or a weekend away, a deeply unpleasant activity to be endured, rather than a nice one to be enjoyed, for 20% of the population, then that 20% of the population is going to stop doing them! And if 20% of a population find that they have pared their activities and the associated spending back to the bare essentials (a quick weekly trip to the supermarket or a pit-stop at the bank to take out some cash) then that’s a whole lot of money which is not being pumped into the economy.

        If you then factor in the non-smoking partners or friends of those smokers who are also now not undertaking those activities (because who wants to go away for a weekend in the Cotswolds on their own??!) then the figure rises, potentially, by another 20%! That’s a whopping 40% of the population now severely curtailing their activities and the associated money-spending that goes with them. Obviously, the figures may vary from country to country or place to place – some places have higher than 20% smoking rates, some have lower – but the basic effect on smokers is the same in any country, regardless of smoking rates, and so the basic calculation still stands – even in a country with smoking rates as low as 10% (is there one??), when doubled, the number definitely becomes high enough to have a severe impact upon any economy.

        But needless to say, the dyed-in-the-wool, not-allowed-to-say-anything-negative-about-the-smoking-ban authorities have steadfastly refused to address this as even a possibility for our economic woes, preferring instead to add this – the Economic Decline elephant – to the other ones in the room. It must be getting very crowded in there, what with the Obesity elephant, the Alzheimer’s elephant, the Depression elephant, the Social Isolation elephant and the Effect on Pubs elephant. One wonders how many more they can fit in …

        • roobeedoo2 says:

          Jax, that reminds me of the stack of haughty circus elephants precariously balanced on a ball in ‘Dumbo’. That ball represents the public’s trust in authority and, as the Isis survey is showing, it is deflating…

        • Frank Davis says:

          I’m looking at this economic impact right now with the Isis survey data. I hadn’t thought about the partners angle. Guess that comes from being single.

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          I think they call it ”knock on effects”

        • In formal economics it’s called “muliplier effects.” Hard to predict accurately and can be VERY substantial, especially when they start feedback loops.

          E.G.

          Ban + Frank staying home.
          Frank/home = Good waitress quitting due to lack of tips
          waitress quitting = bad waitress hired, losing even more customers
          lack of customers = pub closing
          pub closing = pub family and workers going on the dole
          (possible branch: depressed ex-owner shoots self/wife; kids go to orphanage; bad kids’ upbringing sends them into gangs; gangs hook up with terrorists, acquire nuclear bomb; bomb starts WW3; EOLAWKI.)
          pubfamily on dole = taxes get raised
          taxes raised = Frank losing home
          Frank/home = Frank freezing to death in an alley
          Frank/freezing = some good meals for a stray dog
          Stray dog = adopted by movie producer
          Movie = Dog made into new canine star of “Lassie Saves The World”
          Lassie = Leg’s grandchild decides to save the world like Lassie
          World Saving = immortality serum developed
          immortality serum = heaven on earth for billions
          billions = more billions
          more billions = overpopulation crisis
          overpop crisis = WW3
          WW3 = Again, EOLAWKI. (End Of Life As We Know It, btw)

          Sooo…. hard to predict, but something as widespread as thousands of pubs closing due to the ban, along with the massive social fabric impact on both the community and personal levels, is a a recipe ripe for disaster.

          – MJM

  6. nisakiman says:

    And a touch of English stiff upper lip.

    I think a true stiff upper lip requires a damp moustache and sub-zero temperatures.

    I really don’t know how you can live in such low temperatures, Frank. In winter I keep the house at about 20 – 24 C, which I find just about tolerable. My preferred ambient temp is around the 32 – 35 C mark.

    • Frank Davis says:

      My brother keeps his house pretty warm. I’ve not measured the temperature. But it tends to just send me to sleep.

    • beobrigitte says:

      In winter I keep the house at about 20 – 24 C, which I find just about tolerable.

      The “energy self sufficient” guy I know keeps his house in Winter at 25 degrees C. Way too hot for me!!! I keep my house at 18 – 20 degrees C in Winter; heating is off in the bedroom.

      Frank, I hear that one also falls asleep before one freezes to death… (Just in case you wish to lower the temperature in your flat should you feel too sleepy…)

  7. margo says:

    I am very worried for all of you after reading this. I had no idea what you suffer. You get a picture in your mind of people you only know online: Frank – warm and snug at his computer, with a glowing fire in the hearth, surrounded by books, his whisky and neatly-labelled stashes of home-grown baccy; Harley the tough outdoors man, deer-hunter, builder of bunkers; MMcF sparkling with health and passion, in a woolly hat, riding a bike. All wrong, I see.
    I’ve got an old-lady-next-door, too. I know just what Frank means. But she went away for New Year so I had to turn my central heating on. Yesterday, it broke. But thank God she’s back. She came in and fixed it for me.

    • harleyrider1978 says:

      We might suffer each from our own things but we have our good days. We have an undying love for freedom,liberty and the pursuit of justice. We have to fight because thats what has been dealt us in life. A spirit so strong even Nannying Tyrants cant break us. Mind over matter defying all who deprive us of our liberty.

    • Frank Davis says:

      Neat and tidy, I am not.

      But then neither was Albert Einstein. Nor my other hero, Isaac Newton.

      Yet I am indeed surrounded by computers, and books, and whisky, and tobacco.

      • harleyrider1978 says:

        My kinda man………….now if we got ya a wife Frank,you could suffer those daily your a dirtbag speeches husbands get constantly. I envy you.

        • harleyrider1978 says:

          But I wouldnt trade Mrs.Harley for the world,as the world is more totalitarian than any woman. I think

      • Rose says:

        I am not naturally tidy, but I get complaints if my various projects scatter themselves too far around the house.

        For what it’s worth, there is a resident plastic Predator standing on guard above my computer.

  8. harleyrider1978 says:

    The Bulgarians are getting much useful info to fight with from us guys…………..
    liyan Ketsarov
    Наш съмишленик от Гърция ни предостави много интересен сайт ,свързан със спекулациите около забраната и пушенето като цяло :
    http://tctactics.org/index.php/Main_Page
    TobaccoControl Tactics
    tctactics.org
    On this website you’ll find all the information that you need to debunk the Tobacco Controllers’ statements and sound bites, as well as see which individuals, scientists and

    Smokers rights isnt a border issue its a world freedom issue Now!

  9. harleyrider1978 says:

    Frank Im gonna plug Ireland here:
    Calling smokers in Ireland!

    Irish journalist to Forest director Simon Clark, Friday January 11, 2013:

    “We Irish talk a great talk about being rebels, but this country is incredibly conformist. It’s actually shocking how disconnected our self-image is from reality.”

    If you are resident in Ireland, are fed up with excessive anti-smoking regulations and want to speak out, we want to hear from you.

    Please email us at contact@foresteireann.org with a contact telephone number so we can get in touch. (Note: we currently have an opportunity that might interest smokers in the Dublin area.)

    Meanwhile check out these recent news releases from Forest Eireann:

    Campaigners criticise legislation to ban smoking in cars with children

    Government urged to reject revisions to Tobacco Products Directive

    … and these recent media reports:

    Mixed reaction to smoking ban move (Irish Times)

    Ban on smoking in cars with children expected in July (Irish Independent)

    Smoking ban in cars with children to come into effect soon (RTE News)

    For further information bookmark the Forest Eireann blog.
    ——-
    Follow Forest on Twitter
    http://twitter.com/forest_smoking

    Follow Forest director Simon Clark on his blog Taking Liberties
    http://taking-liberties.squarespace.com


    Forest, Sheraton House, Castle Park, Cambridge CB3 0AX
    Telephone: 01223 370156 Email: contact@forestonline.org

  10. lleweton says:

    Delightful post, Frank.

  11. smokingscot says:

    “Particularly with no trousers”

    Way too much info there Squire.

    If you can work one of those mobile phone thingy’s then your standard issue oil filled electric radiator’s a cinch. One switch for 33% power, one for 66% and both for full power. One dial’s a thermostat and the other’s a timer.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0000C6YWY/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=103612307&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B002SJJ610&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_r=197J7ZB9GH1YKA78HQZW

    And taking your room from 10 to 15 degrees should be about 2.5 to 3.00 on the thermostat if it’s set at 1.5 kw output

  12. Janet Huxley says:

    OMG Frank, I laffed me head off at this post. Love reading your posts every day, but this one right cheered me up, and reading it at work (tut) people kept looking up and sayin “what you laughing at!??
    Keep up the good work. Agree with everything you write x

  13. I like 23 Celsius, but in the winter I usually try to keep my bills down by just wearing sweaters and a hat and muddling along at the puter here at about 18-19.

    – MJM

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